How to Patch a Wood Floor Ron Hazelton Online DIY Ideas & Projects

How to Patch a Wood Floor  Ron Hazelton Online  DIY Ideas & Projects

How to Patch a Wood Floor

Video Transcript

RON HAZELTON:

Well a few days ago I made this entryway into the dining room a little bit wider. And in doing so, I exposed some flooring right down here that is in pretty rough shape compared to the flooring around it. So I know Im going to have to replace at least two boards. Now before I start performing surgery on my hardwood floors right here, lets just take a look at how a typical flooring system like this works.

This is three quarter inch thick solid oak, tongue in groove. A groove has been milled on this side and a tongue on this side. Now when this is put down, typically its nailed right through the base of the tongue. The nail goes through at an angle.

You can see it sticking out right down here. And then the groove of the next board just slips right over that tongue. The result is there are no nails visible on the surface which is great. Gives you a good looking floor.

But it makes it a little tough to take one or two pieces out. In fact, the only way I know to do it is to actually split pieces by cutting right down the center. And thats what Im gonna do.

Im setting the blade depth on the circular saw just deep enough to cut through the flooring. This is called a plunge cut and it should be done very cautiously. With the saw running, I lower it slowly until the base plate is resting firmly on the floor.

Then push the saw forward. To make the end cuts, I first score a line using a utility knife. Then set the edge of a chisel into the hollow groove left by the knife blade. Using a series of straight and angled chisel cuts, I can slice quickly and neatly all the way through the plank.

With the end cuts made and the board cut down the middle, I can now begin prying it out. Once the first piece is removed, the rest comes more easily. Well Ive gotten those two boards out fairly cleanly. Very happy with the way that turned out. So that takes care of the hole right here because well replace those in a little bit.

Now though, Ive gotta resurface this part of the floor that was up underneath the old wall. And I think the best tool for this is gonna be a belt sander. Since my main objective right now is to remove material, Im using a rather coarse belt.

60 grit in this case. This is cleaning up very nicely. Ive gotten to the point now where I can put in thnose 2 pieces of wood that were damaged and I had to remove. Now you notice, the only way Im gonna get this in because of this groove is to cut off the bottom half of this groove right here.

And that will allow this piece just to drop in. Ive set the table saw blade just high enough to make the cut I need. Next Ill mark the length of the board. And cut it to size on the miter saw. Okay, see if weve got a fit going here.

I repeat the process for the second board. Give everything a few taps and — now thats what I call a good fit. Even if I do say so myself. Now because of the way we put this down, its not possible to edge nail it through the tongue.

The only choice is to face nail it. And thats what Im doing right now. Now one of the trickiest parts of the flooring repair job like this is touching up or matching the finish. Now if you look over here at this section of the floor, youll see that this an oak floor.

And that all the boards really are different colors and different grain patterns. And Im going to use that to my advantage. Because if I can break the finish, that is the break between the old finish and the new finish, along the edge of a board like this or at the end of a board like this, the eye is really not gonna notice the difference,

Because theres so much natural variation. So Ive taken the finish off this board, this one, this one and this done. Now this one I havent you see. I sanded back to here. What I want to do now is remove the finish back to this joint right here.

Now, theres kind of an interesting history to floor scraping, actually. Back in the 19th Century, this was about the only way to get a finish off the floor, as a matter of fact, there is a very famous Impressionist painting called The Floor Scrapers. Thankfully for us, along came sandpaper and big machine sanders. Otherwise, this would be pretty tough work, refinishing your floors.

Now that worked out pretty well over there. I had a short board in here, joints on both ends. On this board however, I really dont have a joint until way down here and I dont want to take that much finish off. So in this case, Im going to create a joint.

Or at least the illusion of one by taking a straight edge like this. Then I scrape off the finish right up to the line. Now all I haVe to do is fill the nail holes, do a final hand sanding with a small block and fine paper.

Remove the dust with a tack cloth. And Im all set to apply a new finish to the boards. Now these floors were refinished not too long ago and they probably used a clear polyurethane. But Im afraid if I put a clear finish back on top of this, I wont get a really good match.

And why? Because most finishes over time do tend to yellow. And I think this one has a little bit. If I put the polyurethane on, I think theyre gonna be too light. So Im gonna adjust the color just slightly by taking some shellac and Ive added a lot of alcohol to this so its very dilute.

And Im going to brush on kind of a tinting or a toning coat and I think its gonna tie these boards in so that theyll match a little ,more closely. The shellac dries quickly. In just a few minutes, I can applying the polyurethane.

A foam brush works nicely when cutting in a small area like this. Okay, Ill let this dry, give it a light sanding, put on one more coat and nobody is gonna know that that patch was made right there. Except of course for you and me.

Repair a Hole in an Oak Tongue and Groove Floor and Finish the Patch to Match in Color and Gloss

How to Patch a Wood Floor

Video Transcript

RON HAZELTON:

Well a few days ago I made this entryway into the dining room a little bit wider. And in doing so, I exposed some flooring right down here that is in pretty rough shape compared to the flooring around it. So I know Im going to have to replace at least two boards. Now before I start performing surgery on my hardwood floors right here, lets just take a look at how a typical flooring system like this works.

This is three quarter inch thick solid oak, tongue in groove. A groove has been milled on this side and a tongue on this side. Now when this is put down, typically its nailed right through the base of the tongue. The nail goes through at an angle.

You can see it sticking out right down here. And then the groove of the next board just slips right over that tongue. The result is there are no nails visible on the surface which is great. Gives you a good looking floor.

But it makes it a little tough to take one or two pieces out. In fact, the only way I know to do it is to actually split pieces by cutting right down the center. And thats what Im gonna do.

Im setting the blade depth on the circular saw just deep enough to cut through the flooring. This is called a plunge cut and it should be done very cautiously. With the saw running, I lower it slowly until the base plate is resting firmly on the floor.

Then push the saw forward. To make the end cuts, I first score a line using a utility knife. Then set the edge of a chisel into the hollow groove left by the knife blade. Using a series of straight and angled chisel cuts, I can slice quickly and neatly all the way through the plank.

With the end cuts made and the board cut down the middle, I can now begin prying it out. Once the first piece is removed, the rest comes more easily. Well Ive gotten those two boards out fairly cleanly. Very happy with the way that turned out. So that takes care of the hole right here because well replace those in a little bit.

Now though, Ive gotta resurface this part of the floor that was up underneath the old wall. And I think the best tool for this is gonna be a belt sander. Since my main objective right now is to remove material, Im using a rather coarse belt.

60 grit in this case. This is cleaning up very nicely. Ive gotten to the point now where I can put in thnose 2 pieces of wood that were damaged and I had to remove. Now you notice, the only way Im gonna get this in because of this groove is to cut off the bottom half of this groove right here.

And that will allow this piece just to drop in. Ive set the table saw blade just high enough to make the cut I need. Next Ill mark the length of the board. And cut it to size on the miter saw. Okay, see if weve got a fit going here.

I repeat the process for the second board. Give everything a few taps and — now thats what I call a good fit. Even if I do say so myself. Now because of the way we put this down, its not possible to edge nail it through the tongue.

The only choice is to face nail it. And thats what Im doing right now. Now one of the trickiest parts of the flooring repair job like this is touching up or matching the finish. Now if you look over here at this section of the floor, youll see that this an oak floor.

And that all the boards really are different colors and different grain patterns. And Im going to use that to my advantage. Because if I can break the finish, that is the break between the old finish and the new finish, along the edge of a board like this or at the end of a board like this, the eye is really not gonna notice the difference,

Because theres so much natural variation. So Ive taken the finish off this board, this one, this one and this done. Now this one I havent you see. I sanded back to here. What I want to do now is remove the finish back to this joint right here.

Now, theres kind of an interesting history to floor scraping, actually. Back in the 19th Century, this was about the only way to get a finish off the floor, as a matter of fact, there is a very famous Impressionist painting called The Floor Scrapers. Thankfully for us, along came sandpaper and big machine sanders. Otherwise, this would be pretty tough work, refinishing your floors.

Now that worked out pretty well over there. I had a short board in here, joints on both ends. On this board however, I really dont have a joint until way down here and I dont want to take that much finish off. So in this case, Im going to create a joint.

Or at least the illusion of one by taking a straight edge like this. Then I scrape off the finish right up to the line. Now all I haVe to do is fill the nail holes, do a final hand sanding with a small block and fine paper.

Remove the dust with a tack cloth. And Im all set to apply a new finish to the boards. Now these floors were refinished not too long ago and they probably used a clear polyurethane. But Im afraid if I put a clear finish back on top of this, I wont get a really good match.

And why? Because most finishes over time do tend to yellow. And I think this one has a little bit. If I put the polyurethane on, I think theyre gonna be too light. So Im gonna adjust the color just slightly by taking some shellac and Ive added a lot of alcohol to this so its very dilute.

And Im going to brush on kind of a tinting or a toning coat and I think its gonna tie these boards in so that theyll match a little ,more closely. The shellac dries quickly. In just a few minutes, I can applying the polyurethane.

A foam brush works nicely when cutting in a small area like this. Okay, Ill let this dry, give it a light sanding, put on one more coat and nobody is gonna know that that patch was made right there. Except of course for you and me.

Repair a Hole in an Oak Tongue and Groove Floor and Finish the Patch to Match in Color and Gloss


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