Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor, a discussion at The Floor Pro Community

Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor, a discussion at The Floor Pro Community

Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor

«Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor,» in the Ceramic and Stone Q&A forum, begins: «I’m watching Mike Holmes, of the Holmes on Homes TV show, tackle a huge tile job. The ceramic tile was. «

Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor

I’m watching Mike Holmes, of the Holmes on Homes TV show, tackle a huge tile job. The ceramic tile was installed with unmodified thinset over a mesh lath on OSB. Grout was cracking and the tile installer, although showing some skill, started showing up late and sometimes not at all. The trims were very sloppy and in some places unfinished. The installer was apparently using very old installation technology. He finally just stopped showing up.

The tile dealer, who claimed the installer bounced a check for all the materials, came by the home owner’s place looking for the installer. That’s collections in action. Anyway, the installer wasn’t there, but they were invited in by the home owners to look at the work. They did point out some problems and shortcuts.

This tile dealer stepped up to the plate and offered to pay for tile, sealers, adhesives and underlayment to fix their problems. They were the ones who contacted Mike Holmes and the Holmes on Homes production company, Make It Right Productions, to arrange for them to look at the project.

The old tile and mesh had to be torn out. One room came up in only 25 minutes. Ninety percent of the rectangular tile came up unbroken and undamaged. In less than a day, the tear-out was complete and all the mess cleaned up.

Mike Holmes being Mike Holmes, he had decided to replace way more than the problem area and he will be replacing all the tile with tile and hardwood, as well as tearing out the kitchen, right down to stud framing, and replacing cabinets and everything.

The second day started by installing Hardiboard underlayment. While that’s going on, he’s having an electrician rewire the lights, etc. in the kitchen and carpenters tearing out sheetrock. And the problem was just the tile that started at the front door and went throughout a couple rooms.

Anyway, I’ll try to keep this focused on just the floors. Schluter Ditra is being installed in all the tile areas, foyer, kitchen and eating areas. There will be a cobblestone design with large format Porcelain tile. They install the Ditra first and then are leveling out a couple humps with a thinset product. Thinset is spread on the floor and onto the back of each tile during the installation of the tile.

The Floor Shop is doing the hardwood and fixing the railings. Mike has decided on a mosaic inlay for the hallway, which is a dark engineered hardwood. He says the mosaic is a type of limestone, which is surrounded smaller porcelain tiles and that’s surrounded by the hardwood. Siliconized, sanded caulk was used around the tile perimeter where it meets the hardwood.

I don’t know if the procedures that were followed in this episode of Holmes on Homes was correct. I’ve watched a lot of these shows and I don’t remember seeing any of the carpet segments that included a stretcher. Of course, this is all Canadian based and it’s my understanding that the installation pros in Canada don’t feel a stretcher is always a must. Their counterparts here in the US of A, at least most of the pros who hang out here at The Floor Pro Community, do use a stretcher. But like I said, I don’t know about the procedures used in the tile installation. There wasn’t much at all shown about the hardwood install.

Tile was used on the backsplash (looked like the limestone used in the floor insets), but only laminate counter tops. Seems to me, with all the expense and quality put into the rest of the project, granite or quartz would have been the right thing to do. But that’s just me. And apparently the home owners — they wanted granite.

The floor looked beautiful in the end. Wish I had pictures to show. The home owners were in awe and I enjoyed watching the show. But I am curious to know if any of you watch Holmes On Homes and what you think of the program and this project in particular.

Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor

«Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor,» in the Ceramic and Stone Q&A forum, begins: «I’m watching Mike Holmes, of the Holmes on Homes TV show, tackle a huge tile job. The ceramic tile was. «

Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor

I’m watching Mike Holmes, of the Holmes on Homes TV show, tackle a huge tile job. The ceramic tile was installed with unmodified thinset over a mesh lath on OSB. Grout was cracking and the tile installer, although showing some skill, started showing up late and sometimes not at all. The trims were very sloppy and in some places unfinished. The installer was apparently using very old installation technology. He finally just stopped showing up.

The tile dealer, who claimed the installer bounced a check for all the materials, came by the home owner’s place looking for the installer. That’s collections in action. Anyway, the installer wasn’t there, but they were invited in by the home owners to look at the work. They did point out some problems and shortcuts.

Holmes on Homes Fixes a Tile Floor, a discussion at The Floor Pro Community

This tile dealer stepped up to the plate and offered to pay for tile, sealers, adhesives and underlayment to fix their problems. They were the ones who contacted Mike Holmes and the Holmes on Homes production company, Make It Right Productions, to arrange for them to look at the project.

The old tile and mesh had to be torn out. One room came up in only 25 minutes. Ninety percent of the rectangular tile came up unbroken and undamaged. In less than a day, the tear-out was complete and all the mess cleaned up.

Mike Holmes being Mike Holmes, he had decided to replace way more than the problem area and he will be replacing all the tile with tile and hardwood, as well as tearing out the kitchen, right down to stud framing, and replacing cabinets and everything.

The second day started by installing Hardiboard underlayment. While that’s going on, he’s having an electrician rewire the lights, etc. in the kitchen and carpenters tearing out sheetrock. And the problem was just the tile that started at the front door and went throughout a couple rooms.

Anyway, I’ll try to keep this focused on just the floors. Schluter Ditra is being installed in all the tile areas, foyer, kitchen and eating areas. There will be a cobblestone design with large format Porcelain tile. They install the Ditra first and then are leveling out a couple humps with a thinset product. Thinset is spread on the floor and onto the back of each tile during the installation of the tile.

The Floor Shop is doing the hardwood and fixing the railings. Mike has decided on a mosaic inlay for the hallway, which is a dark engineered hardwood. He says the mosaic is a type of limestone, which is surrounded smaller porcelain tiles and that’s surrounded by the hardwood. Siliconized, sanded caulk was used around the tile perimeter where it meets the hardwood.

I don’t know if the procedures that were followed in this episode of Holmes on Homes was correct. I’ve watched a lot of these shows and I don’t remember seeing any of the carpet segments that included a stretcher. Of course, this is all Canadian based and it’s my understanding that the installation pros in Canada don’t feel a stretcher is always a must. Their counterparts here in the US of A, at least most of the pros who hang out here at The Floor Pro Community, do use a stretcher. But like I said, I don’t know about the procedures used in the tile installation. There wasn’t much at all shown about the hardwood install.

Tile was used on the backsplash (looked like the limestone used in the floor insets), but only laminate counter tops. Seems to me, with all the expense and quality put into the rest of the project, granite or quartz would have been the right thing to do. But that’s just me. And apparently the home owners — they wanted granite.

The floor looked beautiful in the end. Wish I had pictures to show. The home owners were in awe and I enjoyed watching the show. But I am curious to know if any of you watch Holmes On Homes and what you think of the program and this project in particular.


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