Engineered or Non-engineered Hardwood Flooring

Engineered or Non-engineered Hardwood Flooring

Engineered or Non-engineered Hardwood Flooring

When you are deciding what to do with your hardwood flooring, knowing the pros and cons of engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring will help you make your decision. Price, availability, placement and ease of care are the big factors in deciding which flooring material is best for you. There can be some environmental issues that come into play as well.

People love the look of wood floors. Nothing else quite warms up a home or makes a home feel inviting like wood flooring does. That’s one reason so many people choose the look of wood flooring for their homes. There are many options for people who want wood, but the two categories that we are going to concentrate on for this article is engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring. These two categories both give you the look of wood, but they each have different pros and cons, which makes them different.

To decide between engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring for your home, you must first become more knowledgeable about these two categories of wood flooring. Engineered hardwood flooring is flooring that has the look of hardwood, but it not composed entirely of hardwood. The top layer is hardwood, but it is made stronger by using different layers of plywood or other inexpensive wood that are glued together in the center.

It has the natural characteristics of the real hardwood, but it is much stronger and more durable than hardwood flooring and it is also less expensive, all because of the use of scrap wood below the surface. It can also be installed in just about any location in your home, including moisture-prone areas. A draw-back to engineered hardwood flooring is that the number of times it can be sanded and finished are more limited because the hardwood veneer is less than solid wood.

Non-engineered hardwood flooring is wood flooring that is composed entirely of hardwood. It is a solid piece of hardwood and it is generally installed using the tongue and groove method of installation. The benefits of non-engineered hardwood flooring include being able to sand and refinish it with few problems. Some of the things that people do not like about non-engineered hardwood flooring are the price and the fact that it cannot be installed in some moisture-prone areas. But the price tends to be better for engineered hardwood planks than non-engineered hardwood planks.

Engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring is easy to install and can even be installed by a do-it-yourselfer. This is good news to homeowners who enjoy being able to remodel their homes on their own and it can save money when you can complete a project on your own. Most of these flooring choices are available in easy to install tongue and groove planks, which means that you do not have to use glue or nails to affix it to the floor, though you can. The planks simply need to be installed over a moisture barrier to minimize the damage from outside moisture sources. Unattached flooring planks are called floating floor.

The choices of wood that is available in engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring will overwhelm you. From the well-known woods like pine and maple to the more exotic woods like bamboo and Honduran rosewood, you will find a wood flooring that meets both your personal desires and your aesthetic needs for your particular room. This helps you to find an engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring that you suits you best in budget, look ad longevity.

Environmental concerns may also play into your choice between engineered and non-engineered hardwood flooring. One environmental issue that may play a role in your decision is that engineered hardwood flooring tends to be more environmentally sensitive because wood scraps are used in the manufacture of the planks, meaning that more of the tree can be used to make the flooring pieces. Another issue might be air quality. Be careful of what products are used to bind the subsurface wood bits so you don’t pollute your air with VOCs (volatile organic compounds) that will seep from some engineered wood for years.

Evaluating your budget and your needs will help you determine whether engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring is right for you. You can find a hardwood species that you enjoy the look of in either category of flooring. Before you know it, you will be enjoying that wood flooring in your room.

Engineered or Non-engineered Hardwood Flooring

When you are deciding what to do with your hardwood flooring, knowing the pros and cons of engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring will help you make your decision. Price, availability, placement and ease of care are the big factors in deciding which flooring material is best for you. There can be some environmental issues that come into play as well.

People love the look of wood floors. Nothing else quite warms up a home or makes a home feel inviting like wood flooring does. That’s one reason so many people choose the look of wood flooring for their homes. There are many options for people who want wood, but the two categories that we are going to concentrate on for this article is engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring. These two categories both give you the look of wood, but they each have different pros and cons, which makes them different.

To decide between engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring for your home, you must first become more knowledgeable about these two categories of wood flooring. Engineered hardwood flooring is flooring that has the look of hardwood, but it not composed entirely of hardwood. The top layer is hardwood, but it is made stronger by using different layers of plywood or other inexpensive wood that are glued together in the center.

It has the natural characteristics of the real hardwood, but it is much stronger and more durable than hardwood flooring and it is also less expensive, all because of the use of scrap wood below the surface. It can also be installed in just about any location in your home, including moisture-prone areas. A draw-back to engineered hardwood flooring is that the number of times it can be sanded and finished are more limited because the hardwood veneer is less than solid wood.

Non-engineered hardwood flooring is wood flooring that is composed entirely of hardwood. It is a solid piece of hardwood and it is generally installed using the tongue and groove method of installation. The benefits of non-engineered hardwood flooring include being able to sand and refinish it with few problems. Some of the things that people do not like about non-engineered hardwood flooring are the price and the fact that it cannot be installed in some moisture-prone areas. But the price tends to be better for engineered hardwood planks than non-engineered hardwood planks.

Engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring is easy to install and can even be installed by a do-it-yourselfer. This is good news to homeowners who enjoy being able to remodel their homes on their own and it can save money when you can complete a project on your own. Most of these flooring choices are available in easy to install tongue and groove planks, which means that you do not have to use glue or nails to affix it to the floor, though you can. The planks simply need to be installed over a moisture barrier to minimize the damage from outside moisture sources. Unattached flooring planks are called floating floor.

The choices of wood that is available in engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring will overwhelm you. From the well-known woods like pine and maple to the more exotic woods like bamboo and Honduran rosewood, you will find a wood flooring that meets both your personal desires and your aesthetic needs for your particular room. This helps you to find an engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring that you suits you best in budget, look ad longevity.

Environmental concerns may also play into your choice between engineered and non-engineered hardwood flooring. One environmental issue that may play a role in your decision is that engineered hardwood flooring tends to be more environmentally sensitive because wood scraps are used in the manufacture of the planks, meaning that more of the tree can be used to make the flooring pieces. Another issue might be air quality. Be careful of what products are used to bind the subsurface wood bits so you don’t pollute your air with VOCs (volatile organic compounds) that will seep from some engineered wood for years.

Evaluating your budget and your needs will help you determine whether engineered or non-engineered hardwood flooring is right for you. You can find a hardwood species that you enjoy the look of in either category of flooring. Before you know it, you will be enjoying that wood flooring in your room.


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