Laminate Flooring

Laminate Flooring

Laminate Flooring

Laminate flooring is a viable solution for using in new construction or in renovations. Floating floors with real wood surfaces, or wood, stone or tile patterns, have benefits not found in other flooring products.

As a verb it means to bond together in layers, while as a noun, it refers to a material that is produced by bonding together layers of material. For flooring, «laminate» is a family of products in which a finish material is fused to a substrate. Laminates can resemble many things, including wood, stone (like marble, slate, or flagstone), tile, or a solid surface of color (though that’s usually saved for countertops).

You may be wondering why you would choose a laminate over a wood, tile or stone floor. There are lots of reasons!

There are some reasons to not choose a laminate floor too.

  • Durability.
  • Maintenance.
  • Noise.

    Before we delve into the pros and cons, let’s understand better what laminate flooring is and a quick review of its history.

    Laminate flooring is typically made with an interlocking tongue-and-groove system that sometimes clicks together and sometimes glues together. It can be pre-finished at the factory or finished after installation. It can be installed on any surface and in any room of your house, including wet rooms like the kitchen and bath. Laminate flooring consists of four main laminated components. First, the decorative surface — wood grain or stone look — made of resin is based melamine or a thin slice of wood. In the middle is a moisture-, heat- and dent-resistant core. On the underside is a balanced backing that adds support. The top is a clear, wear-resistant finish, often of aluminum oxide, which provides the protection and stain resistance.

    Laminate flooring has a hardness factor, assigned by independent testing labs, reported on an AC scale. The AC rating considers resistance to staining and cigarette burns, impact, abrasion, and thickness swelling along plank edges. You want either AC-3 or AC-4; AC-3 is made for heavy residential and light commercial use. AC-4, which is 60% heavier than AC-3, is rated for heavier commercial use but is also fine in homes.

    Pergo, a Swedish flooring company, developed the idea of a laminate floor out of their laminate countertop business, in 1977, introduced it to Europe in 1984 where it has grown in popularity ever since. It was introduced in 1994 to the U.S. where it spread quickly. Now there are numerous companies manufacturing laminate flooring, though Pergo has become the household word for the product.

    Durability is one reason to not choose a laminate floor. Laminate flooring is tough, but by its nature of being made of thin layers it’s not as durable as wood, tile or stone flooring. It can’t be refinished when it gets scratched and the scratches can’t be easily camouflaged. When a laminate plank is damaged it’s challenging to repair it, though with the repair kits you can get from the manufacturer it can be patched. In some cases, you can take the floor up and replace the damaged plank.

    The cost of installed laminate flooring can be cheaper than wood floors, making it one good reason to consider. Speed of installation from start to finish is faster than wood floors. It’s because it comes pre-finished, removing the additional step of coating the surface with a protective seal, and because it isn’t nailed down. It can be noisy to walk on, sounding a bit hollow.

    Environmental concerns are worth evaluating as well. Trees, though a renewable resource, are very slow growing, and using them for floors consumes quite a bit of natural resource. Laminate floors, on the other hand, use manufactured materials (often from scraps of wood, cardboard, or paper) which are more abundant, being gentler on the environment.

    Health issues are still another consideration in purchasing laminate flooring. Some laminate floors are off-gassed at the factory, saving your home or office from the health-challenging fumes. The quality of laminate flooring varies, along with the contents. Some products are made with more urea-formaldehyde and high volatile organic compounds (VOC) ingredients while others are made with low VOC ingredients. If the off-gassing is handled at the factory, you are in better shape.

    Is laminate for you? I enjoyed my laminate flooring, laid in the entry, kitchen, and bathroom. The present owner of that house says the floor looks great more than 11 years later, even after being subjected to men wearing hiking boots, to dogs racing through the house, and all kinds of weather conditions, showing that it can definitely be a durable surface despite its reputation as being fragile.

    Comments

    How do you know which laminate floors are made with low voc materials, off gassed at the factory and not made with urea formaldehyde?

    Very concerned as I am pregnant.

    Thank you!

    nicole at October 14, 2007 8:12 PM

    You have to go by reputation and advertising. And with advertising it’s a crap-shoot.

    I know by reputation and advertising Pergo has taken care the off-gassing at the factory. And it makes a great flooring product.

    I don’t know of the other laminate companies for sure. Read Pergo’s information about their off-gassing and then look at other companies that claim to off-gas their laminate products to compare descriptions of what and how they do that. Maybe you’ll be able to decide for yourself which products to buy.

    Let us know what you buy.

    The Flooring Lady at October 15, 2007 5:02 PM

    same question, I am also concerned w offgassing and urea formaldahyde, same reason. one website says one thing, one says another, a guy that had pergo cottage something in his house took it back to lowes after talking to pergo customer service, as he was having respiratory and other health issues. who to believe?

    Anonymous at November 14, 2007 9:14 PM

    Your question/comment have gotten me to thinking. It was years ago Pergo had a good reputation for having off-gassed their products. Maybe they have changed their approach and don’t off-gas their flooring products, or at least as much. But maybe your friend has such sensitivities that even a careful approach isn’t good enough for him. It’s really hard to say.

    I don’t know who you can believe. There may be a site that has scientific evaluation of different products that can guide us all, but I don’t know about it. It’s really hard to wade through the fact, fiction and hype that’s out there. I try to, but I can miss the boat too.

    The Flooring Lady at November 14, 2007 9:28 PM

    You can call most of the companies, they will tell you the VOC content. I found a pergo floor I liked and then found out that the VOC content of Pergo floors in the U.S. are higher than I am willing to bring into my home. Armstrong, Wilsonart, and a few others have better stuff.

    Clare at December 9, 2007 8:48 PM

    Hi, what is the price for a Pergo Laminate ?

    Stavros at January 1, 2008 2:22 PM

    The prices are all over the board. I’ve seen it as low as $1.17 and as much as $3.23; it could go even higher. But the price can vary depending on what style you buy, what underlayment you choose, and who installs it. Check with your flooring store to see what they are charging.

    The Flooring Lady at January 1, 2008 3:47 PM

    How do you find the AC rating on laminate floors? Does it say it somewhere on the box or the plank itself?

    Thanks

    Anonymous at February 24, 2008 5:04 PM

    You may not find an AC (Abrasion Class) on all laminate flooring, but most will be rated. My understanding is it’s printed on the packaging, not on the flooring itself. Most of the laminate flooring you find in stores has an AC3 rating, but you know you can’t count on that. It is important to pay attention to it to make sure you get the right durability where you need it.

    The rooms that have the most traffic and action should have an AC3 rating while little used rooms, like maybe a bedroom, can get by with an AC1 rating. Ratings over 3 should be reserved for commercial usage where people aren’t walking shoe-free or spending time on the floor.

    The Flooring Lady at February 25, 2008 1:44 PM

    Laminate durability. I see the indentations in the finish created by the high heel marks of womens shoes. In a condo what sort of flooring will resist this?

    Thanks

    Dennis at April 23, 2008 10:36 PM

    I cannot tell for sure in your post if you mean you can imagine this problem happening or if you are already literally seeing this problem on your flooring.

    So long as it has an AC3 rating you shouldn’t find the high heels factor to be a problem; if you already have laminate flooring and you see these problems already. really hard to say since I would have no idea what the AC (Abrasion Class) rating is. AC3 is very strong and durable, a rating higher than this is considered industrial.

    Hardwood flooring is another good option depending upon your preferences and budget.

    The Flooring Lady at April 24, 2008 7:19 AM

    I had laminate flooring installed in my kitchen and eating «nook» in 2006. The ends of some of the planks are separating, and I don’t know what to do about it. Has anyone seen anything like this?

    The contractor who installed it as part of the kitchen remodel has gone out of business (big surprise with this kind of shoddy work!). The planks run under my counter cabinets, which are not open to the floor. I can slide the planks back together, but they will separate again. I have a box of the laminite left, to replace planks with, but would need help on how to do that.

    My home improvement store suggested using some laminate glue to see if I can jury rig a solution, but I am thinking I may just need to bite the bullet and put another type of floor in, like tile.

    Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Tia at May 6, 2008 1:50 PM

    Hi Tia,

    Do you know what kind of flooring was installed — does it show the brand, style or some kind of a product number on the box? Do you know if it’s the kind that just snaps together or is it the kind that glues together?

    Actually, even if it’s the snap together kind, using some laminate flooring glue to make them stay together sounds like a pretty good idea. If the laminate is the snap together kind, and it’s obviously not staying interlocked, I would think that using some glue is a very good option and I wouldn’t consider it ‘jury rigging’ at all.

    The Flooring Lady at May 6, 2008 9:26 PM

    Looking to purchase laminate flooring for the first time for cabin and will use in living area and bathroom and kitchen. We have a standard poodle and kids. I’m worried about scratches and water in the bathroom area. any suggestions on one manufacturer over another? We are looking at mannington and shaw.

    Lisa at May 18, 2008 8:47 AM

    Hi Lisa,

    I’d recommend using your favorite search engine (mine is Google!) to see what others have to say about the two flooring choices you’re considering. I don’t have experience with either particular one myself, so I can’t really guide you in your choice.

    As always, make sure to read up on what the manufacturer recommends for rooms such as the bathroom. I think you’ll be pleased with how versitale the flooing is. Just be sure to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations so that you don’t void your warrany when you lay your new floor. Good luck!

    The Flooring Lady at May 18, 2008 12:21 PM

    I recently installed Shaw Key West Laminate flooring. I love the way it looks, but have been waking up at night with headaches. Do you think there could be a connection? I’ve tried to find the VOC rating, but have been unsuccessful.

    Doug at June 2, 2008 2:14 AM

    Hi Doug,

    I doubt that the laminate flooring a high VOC. Key West is a laminate that does not require glue, so I would assume that none was used.

    www.shawfloors.com

    Just to be fair, it should also be noted that most of the laminate flooring manufactures have gone ‘green’, it’s going to be tough to find products with a high VOC.

    If nothing else, at least until you find out the VOC rating for your particular laminate, you could leave the windows open as much as possible to help with off-gassing. It is also said that cut an onion and place it cut-side up in a bowl of water in each room will help remove odors.

    The Flooring Lady at June 2, 2008 11:24 AM

    FYI: I did check the Shaw website, clicked on the link at the very bottom of page entitled «Shaw Environmental», from there I clicked on Laminate and chose «Hickory», since I knew that was a choice in the Key West line. Yep, Key West showed up, so it must be one of their environmentally friendly laminates. but then again, I suspect they all are.

    The Flooring Lady at June 2, 2008 4:30 PM

    I trying to decide what type of flooring to put into a dining/living room area (great room type). I’ve been told that you can’t but heavy things like piano’s on laminate. Is this true? Do I just need to look at a high AC rating? Is wood better for this? I also have two small dogs. Which type of flooring holds up better for wear, dog toe nails, etc?

    Bonnie at June 13, 2008 1:13 PM

    Hi Bonnie!

    I put heavy-ish furniture on my Pergo laminate flooring, and I put furniture coasters under the feet of the furniture. I have a friend who did that for cork, carpet and now bamboo too.

    I highly recommend Pergo. A friend of mine still has the same floor that was put down 15 years ago,

    and he’s had roommates with dogs, his hiking boots get gravel in the treads and he wears them into the house — and it seems to hold up well. I can’t speak for other laminates, but that is one

    experience that has really been good. He even bought more recently for another room, so that speaks well for it too.

    I have laminate in two rooms, we installed it a little over a year ago. I haven’t noticed any problems at all with furniture marks, and I have this ‘thing’ about rearranging the furniture fairly often. While I don’t have a piano in either of the rooms, there are some heavy wood pieces. Granted, nothing as heavy as a piano, but a very heavy antique wardrobe and a large heavy bookcase that’s filled with books. I would think that the only problem with a piano on the laminate would be from the smallish rollers that pianos sometimes have leaving a dent in the laminate. This could most likely be avoided by placing a little square of carpeting under them or an area rug beneath the piano.

    Hope that helps some!

    The Flooring Lady at June 13, 2008 11:22 PM

    We are looking into the laminated wood look flooring for our bathroom. Is there a special kind just for the bath or will any kind do?

    Jan Waller at July 7, 2008 8:24 PM

    The Flooring Lady at July 7, 2008 11:51 PM

    We are renting a house with what I presume to be laminate flooring. A damp towel was left on the floor and now there is a whitish spot left where the towel was. Can this be removed?

    Lisa at July 11, 2008 12:41 PM

    Lisa, white spots on «wood» surfaces can be challenging. You might try putting mayonnaise on the spot, letting it sit for awhile, and then gently wiping/washing it off to see how it changed the spot. It may just be a matter of letting the area dry out so the natural color can return.

    Good luck. Let me know what worked for you.

    The Flooring Lady at July 11, 2008 1:09 PM

    Hi, my wife and I have recently put down laminate flooring in our basement. The only thing we are disappointed in is that when we alk on it, it seems to flex slightly in places. Is this common with laminate flooring or is there a design flaw during installation. Thanks for your input.

    Nick at July 24, 2008 11:47 PM

    Hi Nick,

    I would be my guess that the original floor wasn’t perfectly level as this is not a common flaw with laminate flooring.

    Can I place another protective covering over my Trafficmaster laminate floor? If so what type would you recommend.

    tony at August 17, 2008 11:38 AM

    Hi Tony,

    I would think that Varathane would make a good product for your needs, however I would recommend giving the manufacturer a call to see what they would recommend so that your choice of products doesn’t void Mowhawk’s warranty. Their phone number is 1-800-2MOHAWK.

    Laminate Flooring

    Laminate flooring is a viable solution for using in new construction or in renovations. Floating floors with real wood surfaces, or wood, stone or tile patterns, have benefits not found in other flooring products.

    As a verb it means to bond together in layers, while as a noun, it refers to a material that is produced by bonding together layers of material. For flooring, «laminate» is a family of products in which a finish material is fused to a substrate. Laminates can resemble many things, including wood, stone (like marble, slate, or flagstone), tile, or a solid surface of color (though that’s usually saved for countertops).

    You may be wondering why you would choose a laminate over a wood, tile or stone floor. There are lots of reasons!

    There are some reasons to not choose a laminate floor too.

  • Durability.
  • Maintenance.
  • Noise.

    Before we delve into the pros and cons, let’s understand better what laminate flooring is and a quick review of its history.

    Laminate flooring is typically made with an interlocking tongue-and-groove system that sometimes clicks together and sometimes glues together. It can be pre-finished at the factory or finished after installation. It can be installed on any surface and in any room of your house, including wet rooms like the kitchen and bath. Laminate flooring consists of four main laminated components. First, the decorative surface — wood grain or stone look — made of resin is based melamine or a thin slice of wood. In the middle is a moisture-, heat- and dent-resistant core. On the underside is a balanced backing that adds support. The top is a clear, wear-resistant finish, often of aluminum oxide, which provides the protection and stain resistance.

    Laminate flooring has a hardness factor, assigned by independent testing labs, reported on an AC scale. The AC rating considers resistance to staining and cigarette burns, impact, abrasion, and thickness swelling along plank edges. You want either AC-3 or AC-4; AC-3 is made for heavy residential and light commercial use. AC-4, which is 60% heavier than AC-3, is rated for heavier commercial use but is also fine in homes.

    Pergo, a Swedish flooring company, developed the idea of a laminate floor out of their laminate countertop business, in 1977, introduced it to Europe in 1984 where it has grown in popularity ever since. It was introduced in 1994 to the U.S. where it spread quickly. Now there are numerous companies manufacturing laminate flooring, though Pergo has become the household word for the product.

    Durability is one reason to not choose a laminate floor. Laminate flooring is tough, but by its nature of being made of thin layers it’s not as durable as wood, tile or stone flooring. It can’t be refinished when it gets scratched and the scratches can’t be easily camouflaged. When a laminate plank is damaged it’s challenging to repair it, though with the repair kits you can get from the manufacturer it can be patched. In some cases, you can take the floor up and replace the damaged plank.

    The cost of installed laminate flooring can be cheaper than wood floors, making it one good reason to consider. Speed of installation from start to finish is faster than wood floors. It’s because it comes pre-finished, removing the additional step of coating the surface with a protective seal, and because it isn’t nailed down. It can be noisy to walk on, sounding a bit hollow.

    Environmental concerns are worth evaluating as well. Trees, though a renewable resource, are very slow growing, and using them for floors consumes quite a bit of natural resource. Laminate floors, on the other hand, use manufactured materials (often from scraps of wood, cardboard, or paper) which are more abundant, being gentler on the environment.

    Health issues are still another consideration in purchasing laminate flooring. Some laminate floors are off-gassed at the factory, saving your home or office from the health-challenging fumes. The quality of laminate flooring varies, along with the contents. Some products are made with more urea-formaldehyde and high volatile organic compounds (VOC) ingredients while others are made with low VOC ingredients. If the off-gassing is handled at the factory, you are in better shape.

    Is laminate for you? I enjoyed my laminate flooring, laid in the entry, kitchen, and bathroom. The present owner of that house says the floor looks great more than 11 years later, even after being subjected to men wearing hiking boots, to dogs racing through the house, and all kinds of weather conditions, showing that it can definitely be a durable surface despite its reputation as being fragile.

    Comments

    How do you know which laminate floors are made with low voc materials, off gassed at the factory and not made with urea formaldehyde?

    Very concerned as I am pregnant.

    Thank you!

    nicole at October 14, 2007 8:12 PM

    You have to go by reputation and advertising. And with advertising it’s a crap-shoot.

    I know by reputation and advertising Pergo has taken care the off-gassing at the factory. And it makes a great flooring product.

    I don’t know of the other laminate companies for sure. Read Pergo’s information about their off-gassing and then look at other companies that claim to off-gas their laminate products to compare descriptions of what and how they do that. Maybe you’ll be able to decide for yourself which products to buy.

    Let us know what you buy.

    The Flooring Lady at October 15, 2007 5:02 PM

    same question, I am also concerned w offgassing and urea formaldahyde, same reason. one website says one thing, one says another, a guy that had pergo cottage something in his house took it back to lowes after talking to pergo customer service, as he was having respiratory and other health issues. who to believe?

    Anonymous at November 14, 2007 9:14 PM

    Your question/comment have gotten me to thinking. It was years ago Pergo had a good reputation for having off-gassed their products. Maybe they have changed their approach and don’t off-gas their flooring products, or at least as much. But maybe your friend has such sensitivities that even a careful approach isn’t good enough for him. It’s really hard to say.

    I don’t know who you can believe. There may be a site that has scientific evaluation of different products that can guide us all, but I don’t know about it. It’s really hard to wade through the fact, fiction and hype that’s out there. I try to, but I can miss the boat too.

    The Flooring Lady at November 14, 2007 9:28 PM

    Laminate Flooring

    You can call most of the companies, they will tell you the VOC content. I found a pergo floor I liked and then found out that the VOC content of Pergo floors in the U.S. are higher than I am willing to bring into my home. Armstrong, Wilsonart, and a few others have better stuff.

    Clare at December 9, 2007 8:48 PM

    Hi, what is the price for a Pergo Laminate ?

    Stavros at January 1, 2008 2:22 PM

    The prices are all over the board. I’ve seen it as low as $1.17 and as much as $3.23; it could go even higher. But the price can vary depending on what style you buy, what underlayment you choose, and who installs it. Check with your flooring store to see what they are charging.

    The Flooring Lady at January 1, 2008 3:47 PM

    How do you find the AC rating on laminate floors? Does it say it somewhere on the box or the plank itself?

    Thanks

    Anonymous at February 24, 2008 5:04 PM

    You may not find an AC (Abrasion Class) on all laminate flooring, but most will be rated. My understanding is it’s printed on the packaging, not on the flooring itself. Most of the laminate flooring you find in stores has an AC3 rating, but you know you can’t count on that. It is important to pay attention to it to make sure you get the right durability where you need it.

    The rooms that have the most traffic and action should have an AC3 rating while little used rooms, like maybe a bedroom, can get by with an AC1 rating. Ratings over 3 should be reserved for commercial usage where people aren’t walking shoe-free or spending time on the floor.

    The Flooring Lady at February 25, 2008 1:44 PM

    Laminate durability. I see the indentations in the finish created by the high heel marks of womens shoes. In a condo what sort of flooring will resist this?

    Thanks

    Dennis at April 23, 2008 10:36 PM

    I cannot tell for sure in your post if you mean you can imagine this problem happening or if you are already literally seeing this problem on your flooring.

    So long as it has an AC3 rating you shouldn’t find the high heels factor to be a problem; if you already have laminate flooring and you see these problems already. really hard to say since I would have no idea what the AC (Abrasion Class) rating is. AC3 is very strong and durable, a rating higher than this is considered industrial.

    Hardwood flooring is another good option depending upon your preferences and budget.

    The Flooring Lady at April 24, 2008 7:19 AM

    I had laminate flooring installed in my kitchen and eating «nook» in 2006. The ends of some of the planks are separating, and I don’t know what to do about it. Has anyone seen anything like this?

    The contractor who installed it as part of the kitchen remodel has gone out of business (big surprise with this kind of shoddy work!). The planks run under my counter cabinets, which are not open to the floor. I can slide the planks back together, but they will separate again. I have a box of the laminite left, to replace planks with, but would need help on how to do that.

    My home improvement store suggested using some laminate glue to see if I can jury rig a solution, but I am thinking I may just need to bite the bullet and put another type of floor in, like tile.

    Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Tia at May 6, 2008 1:50 PM

    Hi Tia,

    Do you know what kind of flooring was installed — does it show the brand, style or some kind of a product number on the box? Do you know if it’s the kind that just snaps together or is it the kind that glues together?

    Actually, even if it’s the snap together kind, using some laminate flooring glue to make them stay together sounds like a pretty good idea. If the laminate is the snap together kind, and it’s obviously not staying interlocked, I would think that using some glue is a very good option and I wouldn’t consider it ‘jury rigging’ at all.

    The Flooring Lady at May 6, 2008 9:26 PM

    Looking to purchase laminate flooring for the first time for cabin and will use in living area and bathroom and kitchen. We have a standard poodle and kids. I’m worried about scratches and water in the bathroom area. any suggestions on one manufacturer over another? We are looking at mannington and shaw.

    Lisa at May 18, 2008 8:47 AM

    Hi Lisa,

    I’d recommend using your favorite search engine (mine is Google!) to see what others have to say about the two flooring choices you’re considering. I don’t have experience with either particular one myself, so I can’t really guide you in your choice.

    As always, make sure to read up on what the manufacturer recommends for rooms such as the bathroom. I think you’ll be pleased with how versitale the flooing is. Just be sure to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations so that you don’t void your warrany when you lay your new floor. Good luck!

    The Flooring Lady at May 18, 2008 12:21 PM

    I recently installed Shaw Key West Laminate flooring. I love the way it looks, but have been waking up at night with headaches. Do you think there could be a connection? I’ve tried to find the VOC rating, but have been unsuccessful.

    Doug at June 2, 2008 2:14 AM

    Hi Doug,

    I doubt that the laminate flooring a high VOC. Key West is a laminate that does not require glue, so I would assume that none was used.

    www.shawfloors.com

    Just to be fair, it should also be noted that most of the laminate flooring manufactures have gone ‘green’, it’s going to be tough to find products with a high VOC.

    If nothing else, at least until you find out the VOC rating for your particular laminate, you could leave the windows open as much as possible to help with off-gassing. It is also said that cut an onion and place it cut-side up in a bowl of water in each room will help remove odors.

    The Flooring Lady at June 2, 2008 11:24 AM

    FYI: I did check the Shaw website, clicked on the link at the very bottom of page entitled «Shaw Environmental», from there I clicked on Laminate and chose «Hickory», since I knew that was a choice in the Key West line. Yep, Key West showed up, so it must be one of their environmentally friendly laminates. but then again, I suspect they all are.

    The Flooring Lady at June 2, 2008 4:30 PM

    I trying to decide what type of flooring to put into a dining/living room area (great room type). I’ve been told that you can’t but heavy things like piano’s on laminate. Is this true? Do I just need to look at a high AC rating? Is wood better for this? I also have two small dogs. Which type of flooring holds up better for wear, dog toe nails, etc?

    Bonnie at June 13, 2008 1:13 PM

    Hi Bonnie!

    I put heavy-ish furniture on my Pergo laminate flooring, and I put furniture coasters under the feet of the furniture. I have a friend who did that for cork, carpet and now bamboo too.

    I highly recommend Pergo. A friend of mine still has the same floor that was put down 15 years ago,

    and he’s had roommates with dogs, his hiking boots get gravel in the treads and he wears them into the house — and it seems to hold up well. I can’t speak for other laminates, but that is one

    experience that has really been good. He even bought more recently for another room, so that speaks well for it too.

    I have laminate in two rooms, we installed it a little over a year ago. I haven’t noticed any problems at all with furniture marks, and I have this ‘thing’ about rearranging the furniture fairly often. While I don’t have a piano in either of the rooms, there are some heavy wood pieces. Granted, nothing as heavy as a piano, but a very heavy antique wardrobe and a large heavy bookcase that’s filled with books. I would think that the only problem with a piano on the laminate would be from the smallish rollers that pianos sometimes have leaving a dent in the laminate. This could most likely be avoided by placing a little square of carpeting under them or an area rug beneath the piano.

    Hope that helps some!

    The Flooring Lady at June 13, 2008 11:22 PM

    We are looking into the laminated wood look flooring for our bathroom. Is there a special kind just for the bath or will any kind do?

    Jan Waller at July 7, 2008 8:24 PM

    The Flooring Lady at July 7, 2008 11:51 PM

    We are renting a house with what I presume to be laminate flooring. A damp towel was left on the floor and now there is a whitish spot left where the towel was. Can this be removed?

    Lisa at July 11, 2008 12:41 PM

    Lisa, white spots on «wood» surfaces can be challenging. You might try putting mayonnaise on the spot, letting it sit for awhile, and then gently wiping/washing it off to see how it changed the spot. It may just be a matter of letting the area dry out so the natural color can return.

    Good luck. Let me know what worked for you.

    The Flooring Lady at July 11, 2008 1:09 PM

    Hi, my wife and I have recently put down laminate flooring in our basement. The only thing we are disappointed in is that when we alk on it, it seems to flex slightly in places. Is this common with laminate flooring or is there a design flaw during installation. Thanks for your input.

    Nick at July 24, 2008 11:47 PM

    Hi Nick,

    I would be my guess that the original floor wasn’t perfectly level as this is not a common flaw with laminate flooring.

    Can I place another protective covering over my Trafficmaster laminate floor? If so what type would you recommend.

    tony at August 17, 2008 11:38 AM

    Hi Tony,

    I would think that Varathane would make a good product for your needs, however I would recommend giving the manufacturer a call to see what they would recommend so that your choice of products doesn’t void Mowhawk’s warranty. Their phone number is 1-800-2MOHAWK.


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