Undertile Heating Tile Warming Cable Mats Cable Kits

Undertile Heating Tile Warming Cable Mats Cable Kits

Underfloor Heating for Tile / Stone Floor

3 systems to choose from

By now you may have already decided that putting undertile heating in is a good idea, it’s now just a case of choosing the right cable.

We supply three types of undertile systems, the first one is the loose wire system that we call a “cable kit”, the cable kit is simply a roll of cable on a drum and you have to mark the floor out and space it yourself on the floor.

The second is the 150w per m² cable mat which is normally used for internal rooms, the cable mat use’s exactly the same cable as the “kit” except the cable spacing has already been done for you, and therefore all you need to do is roll the mat out all over the floor until it’s used up.

The third one is the 200w per m² is normally used in external rooms such as conservatory’s, this is exactly the same cable as the 150w and the “kit” but the cable is spaced closer together to give of more heat.

The way undertile systems work is the closer together the cable is the more heat per m² will be generated with a minimum spacing of 60mm, at 60mm apart this equates to 200w per m², the 150w mat is spaced at about 80mm apart.

All cable mats are 500mm wide, to work out how long the mat will is, simply multiply the m² by 2, so if you have a 2m² mat, this means it will be 4 linear meters long, at 4 linear meters long, cut in half and folded back on itself would make it a 2m² mat.

All our cable systems incorporate a built in return which means you only have one end to connect, this is pretty standard these days but there are still some on the market at the cheaper end were you have to return the cable to the start to complete the circuit.

Also all our cables have an tinned earth copper braid that is encapsulated around the entire length of the cable, giving you maximum protect, how this works is if either the internal electric heater elements were to be damaged they would leak electric which would get carried to earth before it could escape because the tinned copper earth braid is wrapped completely around the elements, alternatively if the cable was pierced from the outside it means the object would be in contact with the earth braid and therefore no electric shock would occur. Not all cables have this style of protection, other systems just have a singular wire strand running through the centre of the cable which isn’t that effective, it’s good that there is form of earth but it doesn’t offer that much protection.

With the safety features mentioned above it means you can use these cables in wet areas like wet rooms and bathrooms in complete piece of mind.

Make the most of the cables.

The use of a tile backer insulation board is always a good idea, there job is to block the heat from penetrating the subfloor, which is normally concrete and if you want primary heating then the backer board is a must, for more information on tile backer boards.

life time guarantee

Cable Kit

Cable kits are brilliant for installations into small bathrooms or small kitchen area’s with awkward fixed objects to work around such as curved shower trays, toilets, kitchen units, kitchen islands.

As mentioned before the cable kit comes as one long continues roll of heating wire on a spool and you have to space the cable out evenly over the floor this offers the installer complete freedom to space the cable evenly no matter how awkward the room shape.

If you’re installing the underfloor heating into a conservatory then we strongly recommend the 200w m² cable mat and 10mm tile backer boards.

If your unsure of how to work out what size kit you need simply times the length of the room by the width in meters e.g. 3m x 3.5m = 10.50m² minus 10% = 9.45sqm round it down to 9sqm and multiply by 150w = 1350 so you would need to choose a kit nearest to that figure a TPC1300 would be the one in this example.

The most important thing to remember is always select an under tile kit which is at least 10% smaller than the free floor area of the room because you cannot cut a cable down and having less cable is better in this situation.

Each under tile cable kit includes:

  • DVCM-10 twin conductor, 3 mm thick heating element
  • 7 Day timer digital thermostat and floor sensor
  • Floor Primer
  • Disposable roller for application of primer
  • High adhesion fixing tape
  • Lifetime guarantee certificate
  • Full installation instructions

The Cable Mat

Under tile cable mats are the most popular choice for larger areas; the mats are available in two outputs, 150w per m² for internal rooms and 200w per m² for conservatories to compensate for the higher heat loss.

If youre installing the underfloor heating into a conservatory then we strongly recommend the 200w per m² and tile backer boards, 10mm is the most common size, but we do thicker boards is required.

If your unsure of how to work out what size mat you need to simply times the length of the room by the width e.g. 3m x 3.5m = 10.50sqm minus 10% = 9.45sqm round it down and TPCM1350 9sqm will fit in at 150w per m² or if it is a conservatory TPCM1800 9sqm.

The most important thing to remember is always select a cable mat which is at least 10% smaller than the free floor area of the room because you cannot cut a cable down and having less cable is better in this situation.

Each cable mat kit includes:

  • DVCM-10 twin conductor, 3 mm thick cable mat
  • 7 Day timer digital thermostat and floor sensor
  • Floor primer
  • Disposable roller for application of primer
  • Undertile Heating Tile Warming Cable Mats Cable Kits
  • Lifetime guarantee certificate
  • Full installation instructions

Running costs Cablekit/mat floor layout

To give you an idea of running cost use the calculation below:

Take your floor area and multiply by the wattage of the cable mat, so if it’s a conservatory you would choose the higher output mat at 200w per m², in this example my floor space is 10m² x 200w = 2000w which is 2Kw (Kilo Watt) multiply 2Kw by the cost of your electric per Kw per hour which is on average 0.09p, 2Kw x 9p = 18p per hour until the system has reached your desired temperature, then the clever thermostat runs on about 40% of power thereafter to maintain your setting 18p x 40% = 72p per hour once it has warmed up, a typical day would work out at something like 0.54p based on 6 hours usage.

Underfloor heating started many years ago. It wasn’t until the Romans arrived that underfloor heating was put into use to heat the floor and walls. During this time the Romans built rooms with floor slabs laid on to raised pillars allowing warm air to circulate beneath the floor. The furnace was normally located at the bottom of an exterior wall; the draught would pull the heat under the floor and up through the walls to chimneys which were in the corners of the rooms.

Today of course we don’t do it like that anymore but the principle still remains the same.

Modern electric underfloor heating systems usual consist of a heating cable or carbon film. The heating cable comes in a couple of different forms, mainly on a cable mat or as a loose cable. A few years ago the most popular form was a loose single cable supplied on a spool. This method required you to work out the cable spacing by dividing the floor space by the length of the cable. You would then start about 5cm in from the edge of the room and loop the cable up and down, leaving enough room and cable to return to the starting point, this then completed the circuit. The trouble with this method is its very time consuming, more often than not you would end up with either too much cable or not enough, meaning pulling up the cable and re-spacing, and also if you didn’t get it right there is a real risk of creating hot and cold spots.

Hot and cold spots exists because the heating cable has at one point being spaced too close together therefore creating a hot spot, or visa versa to far apart creating a cold spot.

To over come this problem manufactures have now created “cable mats” with a “built in return”. Built in returns mean you don’t have to complete the circuit as both the start and finish wire are combined into the one cable, this has many advantages over the earlier cable in the form of not having to leave enough room and wire to fetch it back to the starting point.

Under tile heating mats are simply a loose cable attached to a nylon mesh and pre-spaced to give you different watts per m²; the most common mats usually give you about 150, 160 or 200w per m². These mats save you time during the installation, and lesson the risk of hot and cold spots. Cable mats normally suit square/rectangular rooms, but with most mats you can remove the cable and revert back to the loose system, keeping the original spacing you can stick it to the floor to get around irregular gaps or simply were the mat wont fit in you can pull the cable off and tape it to the floor.

Cable Kit DIY Installation

Below you will find a brief description of how to install a tile/stone cable kit underfloor heating system

A simple guide to complete installation

1. Test the cable first

2. Make the electric provisions as per instructions

3. Prime the subfloor using the primer and roller in the kit

4. Measure the room and mark out the cable spacing as detailed in the instructions

8. Connect to the thermostat

9. Tile over the cable using flexible adhesive and grout

10. Wait at least two week before turning the heating system on for the first time.

Diagram showing timber flooring with underfloor heating cable kit and insulation boards underfloor heating diagram

Cable Mat DIY Installation

Below you will find a brief description of how to install a tile/stone cable mat underfloor heating system

A simple guide to complete installation

1. Test the cable first

2. Make the electrical provision as per instructions

3. Plan the start point and layout

4. Prime the sub-floor with the primer provided

5. Roll out the under tile mat, cutting the mesh in-between the looped cable when the opposite wall is reached

6. Peal the double sided tape of and stick the mat down

7. Fit the floor probe

8. Test the cable again

Diagram showing concrete flooring with underfloor heating cable mat and insulation boards underfloor heating diagram


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