Vinyl Ladies Tips & Tricks for Leather, Vinyl & More

Vinyl Ladies Tips & Tricks for Leather, Vinyl & More

Tips & Tricks

For years Vinyl Ladies have used the following tips and tricks to solve a variety of cosmetic problems and avoid unnecessary and costly repairs. We share these methods with the hope that it will be helpful to others. When in doubt, however, consult a professional in your area. Vinyl Ladies are not liable for any damage incurred by attempting to use these methods.

HOW TO FIX WRINKLING OR BUBBLING WALLPAPER

Lightweight vinyl wallpaper (like the kind found in RVs or prefabricated walls) can wrinkle, bubble, or peel away from paneling. Often this is caused by the friction of an adjacent trim piece, cabinet, counter, or silicone caulking. Attempt to loosen or remove any source of friction. For silicone caulking, carefully use a razor blade to make a smooth cut, separating it from the wall. You won’t see the razor cut, the caulking will be preserved, and the wallpaper will stop being pulled away from the paneling by the counter. Heat the area with a hair dryer (or a heat gun on low setting). Most of the wrinkles or bubbles will disappear on their own. Immediately follow the heat gun with a damp cloth, pressing firmly. The heat will reactivate the adhesive on the wallpaper.

HOW TO REPAIR LINOLEUM OR VINYL FLOORING

Cuts or gouges in your linoleum floor?

First, clean the surface first to remove any dirt or grease. A multipurpose household cleaner works well for dirt. Black grease will require a solvent like mineral spirits or lacquer thinner.

If the tear has wrinkled and buckled, use a heat gun set to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep the heat about six inches away from the floor. Heat until any wrinkles or kinks begin to relax. You can also try using a hair dryer if you don’t have a heat gun. A hair dryer can be held up to an inch away from the linoleum. Do your best to uncurl, stretch, and relax the tear to its former shape. Make sure the subfloor all around the tear is clean and level. The smallest gouge or bit of debris will look and feel like a crater or mountain. If necessary, fill the subfloor with a bit of wood putty and allow to dry.

Re-warm the linoleum as needed to maintain its flexibility. Practice laying the tear back into place, taking note of which edges lay on top of others and get a feel for which end you should begin gluing. Once you glue it, you can’t go back.

When you are confident with piecing the linoleum as flawlessly as possible, apply super glue to the subfloor around the outer edge of the tear. You want a thin but evenly spread layer of glue. A palette knife or even a toothpick works well for this. Then apply super glue to the subfloor directly under the tear. Carefully set the tear as you practiced. Use a board to apply some even pressure. Immediately check to see if any super glue has oozed from the tear onto the surface. If so, remove the glue from the floor and the board with a paper towel and immediately reapply the board and stand on it with your full body weight for at least 30 seconds, allowing time for the super glue to completely bond. If the surface feels rough or sharp, you can hand sand it with some 320 or 220 wet-or-dry sandpaper.

Wipe the surface with water to remove any dust. You can fill any remaining lines or gaps with many layers of nail polish. Translucent flesh tones look more natural than opaque colors on lighter, off-white floors. More opaque earth tones will do better on darker floors. Don’t be afraid to mix colors or use different colors in different layers.

Tips & Tricks

For years Vinyl Ladies have used the following tips and tricks to solve a variety of cosmetic problems and avoid unnecessary and costly repairs. We share these methods with the hope that it will be helpful to others. When in doubt, however, consult a professional in your area. Vinyl Ladies are not liable for any damage incurred by attempting to use these methods.

HOW TO FIX WRINKLING OR BUBBLING WALLPAPER

Lightweight vinyl wallpaper (like the kind found in RVs or prefabricated walls) can wrinkle, bubble, or peel away from paneling. Often this is caused by the friction of an adjacent trim piece, cabinet, counter, or silicone caulking. Attempt to loosen or remove any source of friction. For silicone caulking, carefully use a razor blade to make a smooth cut, separating it from the wall. You won’t see the razor cut, the caulking will be preserved, and the wallpaper will stop being pulled away from the paneling by the counter. Heat the area with a hair dryer (or a heat gun on low setting). Most of the wrinkles or bubbles will disappear on their own. Immediately follow the heat gun with a damp cloth, pressing firmly. The heat will reactivate the adhesive on the wallpaper.

Vinyl Ladies Tips & Tricks for Leather, Vinyl & More

HOW TO REPAIR LINOLEUM OR VINYL FLOORING

Cuts or gouges in your linoleum floor?

First, clean the surface first to remove any dirt or grease. A multipurpose household cleaner works well for dirt. Black grease will require a solvent like mineral spirits or lacquer thinner.

If the tear has wrinkled and buckled, use a heat gun set to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep the heat about six inches away from the floor. Heat until any wrinkles or kinks begin to relax. You can also try using a hair dryer if you don’t have a heat gun. A hair dryer can be held up to an inch away from the linoleum. Do your best to uncurl, stretch, and relax the tear to its former shape. Make sure the subfloor all around the tear is clean and level. The smallest gouge or bit of debris will look and feel like a crater or mountain. If necessary, fill the subfloor with a bit of wood putty and allow to dry.

Re-warm the linoleum as needed to maintain its flexibility. Practice laying the tear back into place, taking note of which edges lay on top of others and get a feel for which end you should begin gluing. Once you glue it, you can’t go back.

When you are confident with piecing the linoleum as flawlessly as possible, apply super glue to the subfloor around the outer edge of the tear. You want a thin but evenly spread layer of glue. A palette knife or even a toothpick works well for this. Then apply super glue to the subfloor directly under the tear. Carefully set the tear as you practiced. Use a board to apply some even pressure. Immediately check to see if any super glue has oozed from the tear onto the surface. If so, remove the glue from the floor and the board with a paper towel and immediately reapply the board and stand on it with your full body weight for at least 30 seconds, allowing time for the super glue to completely bond. If the surface feels rough or sharp, you can hand sand it with some 320 or 220 wet-or-dry sandpaper.

Wipe the surface with water to remove any dust. You can fill any remaining lines or gaps with many layers of nail polish. Translucent flesh tones look more natural than opaque colors on lighter, off-white floors. More opaque earth tones will do better on darker floors. Don’t be afraid to mix colors or use different colors in different layers.


Leave a Reply