CCAT natural concrete stain — Appropedia The sustainability wiki

CCAT natural concrete stain - Appropedia The sustainability wiki

Contents

[edit ] Another CCAT project brought to you by an HSU student

The Campus Center for Appropriate Technology (CCAT) at Humboldt State University was in the process of reconstruction for several years (2004-2007). With reconstruction drawing to an end and plans for moving back into the new old Buck House finalizing, many efforts at finishing touches have begun.

The downstairs of CCAT will be a completely public space, with an ADA accessible bathroom, office space, a possible art gallery, living space, a composting room, a mechanical room, and access to the future attached greenhouse. The floor downstairs was bare concrete, poured by Beacom Construction earlier in the construction process, with a radiant heat system. The need to make the floor beautiful and durable was expressed, with natural and non-toxic methodology preferred. Jess Huyghebaert, late in the Spring 2007 semester, took this on as her Engr305 project, convinced that it is possible to adapt the not-so-eco-friendly concrete floor to something that demonstrates using natural elements and compromise between conventional and non-conventional construction.

[edit ] What you’re about to read.

Looking for a natural stain, I found the answer deep in cyberspace, in a woman’s personal account of staining her own floor with iron sulfate, having read about it in a natural building document. Another fellow, using her guidelines, stained his floor as well and created a similar webpage. These accounts were my bible and only source of information, besides the back of the box of iron sulfate which read «IRON WILL STAIN. sweep concrete surfaces immediately to prevent staining. Use when concrete is dry. If concrete is wet when contact occurs, staining may be impossible to prevent.» YAHOO! So what you are about to read is a blend of «How to», some experimentation and my personal experience with iron sulfate. Put on yer polka dotted shoelaces, turn up the tunes and here we go.

[edit ] Discovery

The difficulty in working with a concrete floor, is that unlike a wall, floors receive much wear and tear and have somewhat complicated chemical make up. Thus, any product used on concrete tends to have harsh components and some chemical composition that is not entirely eco or anthro friendly. When the search was begun for a natural concrete stain and sealant, it became apparent that the majority of solutions to our problem were manufactured by companies and individual «do-it-yourself» solutions were almost nonexistent. Creating your own reality is very rewarding, so buying stain in a can just to roll it on didn’t seem like much fun, and wasn’t entirely appropriate in my eyes. I resolved myself to buying natural stains from eco-companies in Iowa until I stumbled upon Cathy Moore’s web page on her experience with iron sulfate as a stain for concrete. Found in nurseries, hardware and gardening stores, iron sulfate itself is used for greening plants, specifically azaleas and citrus plants, containing some percentage of iron and sulfur. The iron is an element that will soak in and permanently stain the concrete floor. Yah! Being able to stain the floor with my own concoction was very exciting. Iron sulfate is natural components (the ingredients on the box read «11% sulfate, 30% iron», and is used as a fertilizer, thus relatively eco-friendly and certainly not damaging to it’s surrounding environment. Finding a sealant for the floor proved to be more difficult. The point of a sealant is to create a durable floor that will resist wear and tear- requiring some difficult, unnatural solutions. I have bought three different sealants, each a bit more eco-friendly then the other and I plan on testing all three, for durability, user friendliness and toxicity.

[edit ] Implementation

The phrase «permanent stain» might hold some apprehension in it. Don’t get hung up on it- just go for it! Nothing is truly permanent. And if the most horrible thing comes of the stain- you can always make a rug out of recycled cloth to cover it. :)

Contents

[edit ] Another CCAT project brought to you by an HSU student

The Campus Center for Appropriate Technology (CCAT) at Humboldt State University was in the process of reconstruction for several years (2004-2007). With reconstruction drawing to an end and plans for moving back into the new old Buck House finalizing, many efforts at finishing touches have begun.

CCAT natural concrete stain - Appropedia The sustainability wiki

The downstairs of CCAT will be a completely public space, with an ADA accessible bathroom, office space, a possible art gallery, living space, a composting room, a mechanical room, and access to the future attached greenhouse. The floor downstairs was bare concrete, poured by Beacom Construction earlier in the construction process, with a radiant heat system. The need to make the floor beautiful and durable was expressed, with natural and non-toxic methodology preferred. Jess Huyghebaert, late in the Spring 2007 semester, took this on as her Engr305 project, convinced that it is possible to adapt the not-so-eco-friendly concrete floor to something that demonstrates using natural elements and compromise between conventional and non-conventional construction.

[edit ] What you’re about to read.

Looking for a natural stain, I found the answer deep in cyberspace, in a woman’s personal account of staining her own floor with iron sulfate, having read about it in a natural building document. Another fellow, using her guidelines, stained his floor as well and created a similar webpage. These accounts were my bible and only source of information, besides the back of the box of iron sulfate which read «IRON WILL STAIN. sweep concrete surfaces immediately to prevent staining. Use when concrete is dry. If concrete is wet when contact occurs, staining may be impossible to prevent.» YAHOO! So what you are about to read is a blend of «How to», some experimentation and my personal experience with iron sulfate. Put on yer polka dotted shoelaces, turn up the tunes and here we go.

[edit ] Discovery

The difficulty in working with a concrete floor, is that unlike a wall, floors receive much wear and tear and have somewhat complicated chemical make up. Thus, any product used on concrete tends to have harsh components and some chemical composition that is not entirely eco or anthro friendly. When the search was begun for a natural concrete stain and sealant, it became apparent that the majority of solutions to our problem were manufactured by companies and individual «do-it-yourself» solutions were almost nonexistent. Creating your own reality is very rewarding, so buying stain in a can just to roll it on didn’t seem like much fun, and wasn’t entirely appropriate in my eyes. I resolved myself to buying natural stains from eco-companies in Iowa until I stumbled upon Cathy Moore’s web page on her experience with iron sulfate as a stain for concrete. Found in nurseries, hardware and gardening stores, iron sulfate itself is used for greening plants, specifically azaleas and citrus plants, containing some percentage of iron and sulfur. The iron is an element that will soak in and permanently stain the concrete floor. Yah! Being able to stain the floor with my own concoction was very exciting. Iron sulfate is natural components (the ingredients on the box read «11% sulfate, 30% iron», and is used as a fertilizer, thus relatively eco-friendly and certainly not damaging to it’s surrounding environment. Finding a sealant for the floor proved to be more difficult. The point of a sealant is to create a durable floor that will resist wear and tear- requiring some difficult, unnatural solutions. I have bought three different sealants, each a bit more eco-friendly then the other and I plan on testing all three, for durability, user friendliness and toxicity.

[edit ] Implementation

The phrase «permanent stain» might hold some apprehension in it. Don’t get hung up on it- just go for it! Nothing is truly permanent. And if the most horrible thing comes of the stain- you can always make a rug out of recycled cloth to cover it. :)

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