Solid Hardwood Flooring Installing a wood Floor how to flooring how to hardwood floor

Solid Hardwood Flooring Installing a wood Floor how to flooring how to hardwood floor

Solid Hardwood Flooring

If you want to upgrade your home, nothing will add beauty and value as effectively as installing hardwood floors. Replacing old carpeting or vinyl with hardwood will be an improvement that will catch the eye of your guests, and of prospective purchasers if you are putting your house on the market. Hardwood floors can be installed anywhere in your home: foyers, corridors, and living spaces are most common, and are the first places your guests or prospective buyers will see, but you can also install hardwood in your bedrooms, kitchen, and even bathrooms, provided you finish the floors properly and wipe up spills in timely fashion. Basements are the one area of your home where hardwood floors are not recommended: the high humidity of basements, or any room below ground level, will cause your floors to cup or buckle.

The first choice for most buyers is solid hardwood. Because you are purchasing solid wood, the quality and durability of your floors will be unequalled. Solid hardwood floors can be refinished several times, so, with proper care, your floors will last 100 year and longer. (Some buyers elect to save on costs by purchasing engineered hardwood floors — a thin veneer of genuine hardwood on top, backed by a thicker sublayer of plywood — but engineered hardwood can only be refinished a limited number of times.)

The most popular species of hardwood are red oak, white oak, and maple, but you will have dozens of choices of both domestic hardwoods and exotic imports. Different wood species are rated according to the Janka Hardness Scale — a measure of the force required to embed a .444-inch steel ball to half its diameter in the wood. The Janka scale is thus useful in determining how easily your floor will dent. Imports from Brazil and Bolivia are the hardest woods; popular domestic woods such as oak and maple fall somewhere in the middle of the Janka scale. Pine and fir are the softest woods. Be sure to discuss your needs with your dealer; some soft woods may not be appropriate for high-traffic areas.

Also, you will have a choice between prefinished boards and unfinished boards. The latter are prestained and presealed — once you secure the boards in place, you can begin using your floor immediately. If you are installing your own floors, this may be the best choice. Unfinished boards, once installed, will need to be sanded with a drum sander several times with progressively finer grades of sandpaper; stained; and finally finished with a polyurethane or other protective coat (again, several coats, lightly sanded between coats). Many people believe that unfinished floorboards that are finished and treated once installed in your home have a more classic appearance than prefinished boards. However, if you are inexperienced with a drum sander, consider hiring a professional at least for this phase of installation. A mishandled drum sander can damage your floor.

Woods are also graded according to the quality of their appearance. For both finished and unfinished boards, «clear grade» indicates the highest quality in terms of uniformity and absence of knots and blemishes. «Select and better» is the next grade, also indicating uniformity, and paucity of blemishes. Lower grades of wood tend to show the natural character of the wood; some boards may be lighter and others darker, and pinholes and knots are more common. These lower grades are preferable in some circumstances, if you wish to produce a rustic, traditional, or «antique» look. Note that the grading system is developed and maintained by the National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA), but not all manufactures adhere to this system; and some wood species, such as maple, have their own grading rules.

Solid hardwood floorboards are cut from solid pieces of wood. Generally, they are 3/4″ thick and milled with interlocking tongue and groove, allowing the boards to snap together during installation. Nails are driven through the tongues to secure the boards to the subfloor, leaving the nailholes invisible in the finished floor.

The width of the floorboards can vary; widths that are under 3 inches are referred to as «strips,» while boards wider than 3 inches are «planks.» Plank floors result in a rustic, farmhouse appearance; strip flooring is more elegant and formal. Planks, however, are more susceptible to swelling or shrinkage, depending on humidity levels in your home. Swelling can cause «cupping,» in which the edges of the planks lift up, or «crowning,» in which the center of the board bows up. Shrinkage can cause gaps between the boards. These natural alterations in your plank floors over time may add to the rustic flavor of your house, but excessive movement is undesirable. If you have a beach house, plank floors may be unsuitable.

When you purchase your floors, the lengths of the boards will vary, generally from 12 to 84 inches. When installing the floor, make sure that the ends don’t line up from row to row; select board lengths ensuring that there is at least 8 inches of space between ends, from row to row. This pattern of placement will improve the appearance of your floor, and also your floor’s strength.

Once installed, it is important to maintain your wood floors. Keep your floors swept clean with a dust mop or vacuum. Get into the habit of removing your street shoes when you enter your home, as shoes can track in dirt and grime, which acts like sandpaper on your floors. Use only cleaning products that are recommended by your dealer for your particular floor. Wipe up spills quickly; don’t wet-mop your floors, and don’t allow any standing water on your floors. Use area rugs, particularly in high-traffic areas and in places subject to spills (in a kitchen, for instance), and use pads under the legs of heavy furniture to prevent scratching. Some wood species may be subject to fading or discoloration in direct sunlight; in such cases, install blinds or drapes on your windows, and keep them drawn during periods of heaviest sunlight.

With proper care, your solid hardwood floors will give you pleasure for decades.

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  • Solid Hardwood Flooring
  • solid wood flooring
  • how to install solid hardwood floors
  • how to install solid hardwood floor
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  • podlaha z tvrdého dreva
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  • 堅木張り

Solid Hardwood Flooring

If you want to upgrade your home, nothing will add beauty and value as effectively as installing hardwood floors. Replacing old carpeting or vinyl with hardwood will be an improvement that will catch the eye of your guests, and of prospective purchasers if you are putting your house on the market. Hardwood floors can be installed anywhere in your home: foyers, corridors, and living spaces are most common, and are the first places your guests or prospective buyers will see, but you can also install hardwood in your bedrooms, kitchen, and even bathrooms, provided you finish the floors properly and wipe up spills in timely fashion. Basements are the one area of your home where hardwood floors are not recommended: the high humidity of basements, or any room below ground level, will cause your floors to cup or buckle.

The first choice for most buyers is solid hardwood. Because you are purchasing solid wood, the quality and durability of your floors will be unequalled. Solid hardwood floors can be refinished several times, so, with proper care, your floors will last 100 year and longer. (Some buyers elect to save on costs by purchasing engineered hardwood floors — a thin veneer of genuine hardwood on top, backed by a thicker sublayer of plywood — but engineered hardwood can only be refinished a limited number of times.)

The most popular species of hardwood are red oak, white oak, and maple, but you will have dozens of choices of both domestic hardwoods and exotic imports. Different wood species are rated according to the Janka Hardness Scale — a measure of the force required to embed a .444-inch steel ball to half its diameter in the wood. The Janka scale is thus useful in determining how easily your floor will dent. Imports from Brazil and Bolivia are the hardest woods; popular domestic woods such as oak and maple fall somewhere in the middle of the Janka scale. Pine and fir are the softest woods. Be sure to discuss your needs with your dealer; some soft woods may not be appropriate for high-traffic areas.

Also, you will have a choice between prefinished boards and unfinished boards. The latter are prestained and presealed — once you secure the boards in place, you can begin using your floor immediately. If you are installing your own floors, this may be the best choice. Unfinished boards, once installed, will need to be sanded with a drum sander several times with progressively finer grades of sandpaper; stained; and finally finished with a polyurethane or other protective coat (again, several coats, lightly sanded between coats). Many people believe that unfinished floorboards that are finished and treated once installed in your home have a more classic appearance than prefinished boards. However, if you are inexperienced with a drum sander, consider hiring a professional at least for this phase of installation. A mishandled drum sander can damage your floor.

Woods are also graded according to the quality of their appearance. For both finished and unfinished boards, «clear grade» indicates the highest quality in terms of uniformity and absence of knots and blemishes. «Select and better» is the next grade, also indicating uniformity, and paucity of blemishes. Lower grades of wood tend to show the natural character of the wood; some boards may be lighter and others darker, and pinholes and knots are more common. These lower grades are preferable in some circumstances, if you wish to produce a rustic, traditional, or «antique» look. Note that the grading system is developed and maintained by the National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA), but not all manufactures adhere to this system; and some wood species, such as maple, have their own grading rules.

Solid hardwood floorboards are cut from solid pieces of wood. Generally, they are 3/4″ thick and milled with interlocking tongue and groove, allowing the boards to snap together during installation. Nails are driven through the tongues to secure the boards to the subfloor, leaving the nailholes invisible in the finished floor.

The width of the floorboards can vary; widths that are under 3 inches are referred to as «strips,» while boards wider than 3 inches are «planks.» Plank floors result in a rustic, farmhouse appearance; strip flooring is more elegant and formal. Planks, however, are more susceptible to swelling or shrinkage, depending on humidity levels in your home. Swelling can cause «cupping,» in which the edges of the planks lift up, or «crowning,» in which the center of the board bows up. Shrinkage can cause gaps between the boards. These natural alterations in your plank floors over time may add to the rustic flavor of your house, but excessive movement is undesirable. If you have a beach house, plank floors may be unsuitable.

When you purchase your floors, the lengths of the boards will vary, generally from 12 to 84 inches. When installing the floor, make sure that the ends don’t line up from row to row; select board lengths ensuring that there is at least 8 inches of space between ends, from row to row. This pattern of placement will improve the appearance of your floor, and also your floor’s strength.

Once installed, it is important to maintain your wood floors. Keep your floors swept clean with a dust mop or vacuum. Get into the habit of removing your street shoes when you enter your home, as shoes can track in dirt and grime, which acts like sandpaper on your floors. Use only cleaning products that are recommended by your dealer for your particular floor. Wipe up spills quickly; don’t wet-mop your floors, and don’t allow any standing water on your floors. Use area rugs, particularly in high-traffic areas and in places subject to spills (in a kitchen, for instance), and use pads under the legs of heavy furniture to prevent scratching. Some wood species may be subject to fading or discoloration in direct sunlight; in such cases, install blinds or drapes on your windows, and keep them drawn during periods of heaviest sunlight.

With proper care, your solid hardwood floors will give you pleasure for decades.

Incoming search terms:

  • kietmedzio grindys
  • Solid Hardwood Flooring
  • solid wood flooring
  • how to install solid hardwood floors
  • how to install solid hardwood floor
  • installing solid hardwood flooring
  • how to install solid hardwood flooring
  • podlaha z tvrdého dreva
  • trdna tla les
  • 堅木張り


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