Article laminate flooring is built for the 21st century

Article laminate flooring is built for the 21st century

Hardwood flooring issues

Peaking boards

Peaking boards can result from three common issues. Firstly, hardwood floors are susceptible to temperature changes and moisture content in the air. A rise in temperature or moisture levels in the air will result in hardwood flooring expanding. Peaking can be as a result of the room temperature or moisture levels rising drastically over a short period of time, to a level substantially higher than when the wood was installed, resulting in peaking. This situation is remedied by cooling the temperature in the room down to a level that is conducive with the installation temperature.

Peaking boards

Peaking boards can result from three common issues. Firstly, hardwood floors are susceptible to temperature changes and moisture content in the air. A rise in temperature or moisture levels in the air will result in hardwood flooring expanding. Peaking can be as a result of the room temperature or moisture levels rising drastically over a short period of time, to a level substantially higher than when the wood was installed, resulting in peaking. This situation is remedied by cooling the temperature in the room down to a level that is conducive with the installation temperature.

Secondly peaking boards can arise if there is not a sufficient expansion gap between the floor and surrounding walls or moldings. An expansion gap is a small space that is left open between the floor and the walls and fixed moldings. If this gap is insufficient, the floor does not have enough space to expand into and thus results in peaking. To remedy this, it is necessary to find the wall gap or molding that is causing the problem, by following the peaking boards to where they meet the wall or molding. Remove the baseboard or molding and cut the wood so that there is a sufficient expansion gap, then replace the baseboard or molding.

Peaking can also be a result of fixing the edge of the floor to a molding. It is important that the hardwood floor is not affixed to any moldings around the perimeter of the installation, as this will prevent the floor from expanding as necessary.

Gapping boards

Hardwood is susceptible to changes in air temperature and moisture levels. Gapping results when the air temperature drops to a level substantially below the level at which the floor was installed, resulting in the boards shrinking and thus creating gaps. The best way to remedy this is to increase the room temperature.

Warping floor boards

Warping is always moisture or water related. Warping can result from increased subfloor moisture that penetrates the wood, or as result of excess topical water, usually caused by wet mopping or liquid spills that are not mopped up immediately. Warped boards will sometimes straighten over time, as the wood dries out. If the boards do not level out, it is necessary to replace the damaged boards.

Stains

Hardwood is inherently porous, making it susceptible to staining. The affected area must be sanded and refinished. Note that when refinishing a floor, it is often not possible to match the stain to the existing floor, even when using the same color stain, as the color of hardwood changes over time.

Hollow sounding floor

Hardwood floors that sound hollow when walked upon is usually a result of insufficient adhesive between the floor and subfloor, or as result of undulations in the subfloor surface, resulting in insufficient contact between the subfloor and hardwood floor. Hollow sounding floors can also be as a result of the adhesive being contaminated by water and losing its adhesion properties. This situation is remedied through the use of injecting a manufacturers approved adhesive between the boards and into the space between the hardwood floor and subfloor. Always check with the manufacturers recommended guidelines for approved adhesive and methods.


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