Garage floor paint — pros cons

Garage floor paint - pros cons

Painting Garage Floor

Re: Garage floor paint — pros? cons?

Well, it looks better for a while; but then the paint starts coming loose

depending upon the quality of your cleaning job. Dirt, oil and other

petroleum products are the culprits and it’s impossible to get the last bit

out of concrete via cleaning.

with garage floor paint? Or, is it just a gimmick to get

people to buy

more stuff they really don’t need?

Probably 6 of one, half a dozen of the other g.

Personally, I think there are valid pros to it. Cement dusts

considerably without protection of some kind, with results

ranging from wear of the surface to tracking it into the house to

an abrasive dust in the air whenever it’s stirred up. Oh, and of

course, a painted surface cleans up a lot easier too if, like we

do, you occasionally use the garage for a party or eating place

during reunions, stuff like that.

I also like the looks of it a lot better, and the fact that I

Probably the most important part of such a job is proper

preparation of the cement beforehand. You have to get the right

materials to remove or neutralize oil drippings, greasy spots,

etc. but it’s not hard to do with the right products. Most any

car parts place has the right stuff, and the instructions are

good as I recall.

Then you do a final etching with Muriatic acid on any bare

concrete and you’re ready to paint.

I used a latex product on mine because, after a little study,

I liked the idea of wetting the cement to let the paint into it

as opposed to just sealing it on the top surface. And no, it’s

NOT true that latex products will stick to tires; as long as

you’re using the proper product and let it cure properly. I

think I gave it a week before I put the cars on it; not sure, but

I waited longer than it said I had to, just to be sure.

We moved here in ’83 so I think it was first painted in ’85.

I’m pretty sure it was ’99 when I redid it, using the same color

so I didn’t have to go under the benches, etc. It was pretty

well worn by that time, especially where the car tires sat, but

still in decent shape. I think the trick is to do repaints

before the cement’s actually re-exposed. It took a LOT less

paint that time since it was still sealed or whatever you want

to call it.

It’s 2006 now, and it’s getting ready for another redo. I’ve

been sick the last few years so I haven’t done as good a job as I

used to of keeping the salt, slush & sand swept out every now and

then. There’s even some cement poking thru this time. Plus,

for whatever reason, my wife likes to turn the steering wheel

while the car’s not moving, and that’s rough on any floor. This

year I’ve taken to laying cardboard where she parks just to

protect the floor a little until I get to redo it next summer.

No experience with the epoxies and high-end stuff you can use on

a garage floor, but I’ve seen a couple that look as good as the

day they were put down. They even always look waxed. And, a

little slippery when wet, I might add. But, I’m not that much

Garage floor paint — pros? cons?

Garage floor paint — pros? cons?

TheDave© no@no.com wrote in message news:aZwCf.15$9S4.6@fe16.lga.

Well, it looks better for a while; but then the paint starts coming loose

depending upon the quality of your cleaning job. Dirt, oil and other

petroleum products are the culprits and it’s impossible to get the last bit

out of concrete via cleaning.

Garage floor paint — pros? cons?

with garage floor paint? Or, is it just a gimmick to get

people to buy

more stuff they really don’t need?

Probably 6 of one, half a dozen of the other g.

Personally, I think there are valid pros to it. Cement dusts

considerably without protection of some kind, with results

ranging from wear of the surface to tracking it into the house to

an abrasive dust in the air whenever it’s stirred up. Oh, and of

course, a painted surface cleans up a lot easier too if, like we

do, you occasionally use the garage for a party or eating place

during reunions, stuff like that.

I also like the looks of it a lot better, and the fact that I

Probably the most important part of such a job is proper

preparation of the cement beforehand. You have to get the right

materials to remove or neutralize oil drippings, greasy spots,

etc. but it’s not hard to do with the right products. Most any

car parts place has the right stuff, and the instructions are

good as I recall.

Then you do a final etching with Muriatic acid on any bare

concrete and you’re ready to paint.

I used a latex product on mine because, after a little study,

I liked the idea of wetting the cement to let the paint into it

as opposed to just sealing it on the top surface. And no, it’s

NOT true that latex products will stick to tires; as long as

you’re using the proper product and let it cure properly. I

think I gave it a week before I put the cars on it; not sure, but

I waited longer than it said I had to, just to be sure.

We moved here in ’83 so I think it was first painted in ’85.

I’m pretty sure it was ’99 when I redid it, using the same color

so I didn’t have to go under the benches, etc. It was pretty

well worn by that time, especially where the car tires sat, but

still in decent shape. I think the trick is to do repaints

before the cement’s actually re-exposed. It took a LOT less

paint that time since it was still sealed or whatever you want

to call it.

It’s 2006 now, and it’s getting ready for another redo. I’ve

been sick the last few years so I haven’t done as good a job as I

used to of keeping the salt, slush & sand swept out every now and

then. There’s even some cement poking thru this time. Plus,

for whatever reason, my wife likes to turn the steering wheel

while the car’s not moving, and that’s rough on any floor. This

year I’ve taken to laying cardboard where she parks just to

protect the floor a little until I get to redo it next summer.

No experience with the epoxies and high-end stuff you can use on

a garage floor, but I’ve seen a couple that look as good as the

day they were put down. They even always look waxed. And, a

little slippery when wet, I might add. But, I’m not that much


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