Nail or Glue Wood Flooring Installation Wood and Beyond Blog

Nail or Glue Wood Flooring Installation Wood and Beyond Blog

Nail or Glue Wood Flooring Installation?

This is a commonly asked question amongst the Wood and Beyond client base, which is why we thought it would be useful to put together this short guide to help you decide.  Before recommending which option might suit your project, we’ll start by giving a short description of the two methods.

Nail down installation

Nail-down installation is a straightforward way of fitting engineered or solid wood flooring but is only advisable if you have a wooden subfloor. When installing your new floor over plywood, the direction you choose to lay the planks doesn’t matter.  However, if you are nailing down a new floor over existing floorboards you must run the planks of the new floor at a 90-degree angle to the existing floor. This is done to ensure stability and to avoid the risk of warping or buckling.  Here are some key things to remember when choosing nail-down installation:

  1. Like all installations, make sure you have allowed your 10-15mm expansion gap all round your room.
  2. Fix both the first and the last rows from the top of the board with either a nail, screw or staple, 15mm from the edge of the board.
  3. When you have laid your first row of boards and have secured them from the top, you should nail or staple subsequent boards just above the tongue, at a 45-degree angle.
  4. Fix the last row of boards from the top as described in 2.  above.

Glue-down installation

Glue down as an installation method for engineered and solid wood floors involves using a bonding agent, adhesive or glue that you put directly on to your subfloor before laying your floor.  As an installation method, glue down is particularly suited to either concrete or wood subfloors, or any other solid surface where the glue will bond easily.  If you choose this method of fitting, you need to make sure that there’s no dampness in your subfloor.  If you have any doubt about dampness, we recommend that you install a two-part epoxy damp proof membrane to make sure that none of the residual dampness rises into your new floor, causing future damage.  Here are some key things to remember when choosing glue-down installation:

  1. Once you have correctly prepared your subfloor, you should start to apply your adhesive.  It is important to apply the glue in small areas at a time.  It is best to apply the glue in a crisscross pattern, starting at the corner of the room furthest away from the door.
  2. As with all other fitting methods, allow for your 10-15mm expansion gap all around your room.
  3. Slide your first board into position, with the tongue of the board facing into the room.  NOTE: with this type of installation, you don’t need to glue the tongue and groove.
  4. Work along your first row of boards, tapping them into place with the aid of a tapping board.  Continue until you have completed the whole room.  Once again, you may have to cut the last row of boards to fit.

Which should you choose?

The response to this question will be strongly driven by the material of your subfloor and thereafter how quickly you need to get your furnishings back in the room you’re re-flooring.

If you have a concrete sub-floor. then nail-down simply isn’t an option for you and you’ll need to choose glue-down if these are the only two installation options available to you.  On the other hand, if you have a wooden sub-floor. then theoretically, either option will be open to you, so you should choose the option that suits your DIY skills best if you are doing the work yourself.  If you’ve chosen a professional to fit your floor, they will help you make the right decision.

Finally, if you need your room back to normal quickly, then because of the drying time of glue-down, nail-down will work better for you.  This option will allow you to put your furnishings back in place pretty much immediately after completion.

If you’re struggling to choose the right installation method for your wooden floor, why not get in touch ?  At Wood and Beyond, we’re always happy to help.

Share and Enjoy:

Nail or Glue Wood Flooring Installation?

This is a commonly asked question amongst the Wood and Beyond client base, which is why we thought it would be useful to put together this short guide to help you decide.  Before recommending which option might suit your project, we’ll start by giving a short description of the two methods.

Nail down installation

Nail-down installation is a straightforward way of fitting engineered or solid wood flooring but is only advisable if you have a wooden subfloor. When installing your new floor over plywood, the direction you choose to lay the planks doesn’t matter.  However, if you are nailing down a new floor over existing floorboards you must run the planks of the new floor at a 90-degree angle to the existing floor. This is done to ensure stability and to avoid the risk of warping or buckling.  Here are some key things to remember when choosing nail-down installation:

  1. Like all installations, make sure you have allowed your 10-15mm expansion gap all round your room.
  2. Fix both the first and the last rows from the top of the board with either a nail, screw or staple, 15mm from the edge of the board.
  3. When you have laid your first row of boards and have secured them from the top, you should nail or staple subsequent boards just above the tongue, at a 45-degree angle.
  4. Fix the last row of boards from the top as described in 2.  above.

Glue-down installation

Glue down as an installation method for engineered and solid wood floors involves using a bonding agent, adhesive or glue that you put directly on to your subfloor before laying your floor.  As an installation method, glue down is particularly suited to either concrete or wood subfloors, or any other solid surface where the glue will bond easily.  If you choose this method of fitting, you need to make sure that there’s no dampness in your subfloor.  If you have any doubt about dampness, we recommend that you install a two-part epoxy damp proof membrane to make sure that none of the residual dampness rises into your new floor, causing future damage.  Here are some key things to remember when choosing glue-down installation:

  1. Once you have correctly prepared your subfloor, you should start to apply your adhesive.  It is important to apply the glue in small areas at a time.  It is best to apply the glue in a crisscross pattern, starting at the corner of the room furthest away from the door.
  2. As with all other fitting methods, allow for your 10-15mm expansion gap all around your room.
  3. Slide your first board into position, with the tongue of the board facing into the room.  NOTE: with this type of installation, you don’t need to glue the tongue and groove.
  4. Work along your first row of boards, tapping them into place with the aid of a tapping board.  Continue until you have completed the whole room.  Once again, you may have to cut the last row of boards to fit.

Which should you choose?

The response to this question will be strongly driven by the material of your subfloor and thereafter how quickly you need to get your furnishings back in the room you’re re-flooring.

If you have a concrete sub-floor. then nail-down simply isn’t an option for you and you’ll need to choose glue-down if these are the only two installation options available to you.  On the other hand, if you have a wooden sub-floor. then theoretically, either option will be open to you, so you should choose the option that suits your DIY skills best if you are doing the work yourself.  If you’ve chosen a professional to fit your floor, they will help you make the right decision.

Finally, if you need your room back to normal quickly, then because of the drying time of glue-down, nail-down will work better for you.  This option will allow you to put your furnishings back in place pretty much immediately after completion.

If you’re struggling to choose the right installation method for your wooden floor, why not get in touch ?  At Wood and Beyond, we’re always happy to help.

Share and Enjoy:


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