How Much Does It Cost To Install Cork Flooring in the Kitchen The Kitchn

How Much Does It Cost To Install Cork Flooring in the Kitchen The Kitchn

How Much Does It Cost To Install Cork Flooring in the Kitchen?

We’re asking readers to share how much they spent on a given item, project, or upgrade in the kitchen. We hope this information proves helpful to anyone needing to get a basic sense of how much that something costs.

If relevant to you, please share any and all details on installing cork floors in your kitchen. What did it entail? How much was the labor? What problems came up?

Cambria Bold

5 Comments

We installed cork in a long hallway (not the kitchen), doing the install ourselves. Ours was a floating laminate-style in 100cm x 20cm planks (IIRC), with snap-in connections between planks.

Oh, and the price was extremely cheap, as we picked up a closeout color from a local shop — I think it was around $2/sq. ft.

I did cork flooring in a 15′ x 20′ (ish) kitchen, using Rossio Cork from Lumber Liquidators, and the flooring cost around $800, including oak treads for 3 steps down to a side door landing. Installation was a little under $1150, and was completed in a day by a professional Lumber Liquidators partner based out of Minneapolis. We probably could’ve installed ourselves and saved the labor costs, but at the time I thought it would be easier and ultimately better quality. I’m not sure that turned out to be the case, but it definitely saved some cursing and frustration on my part. As @joelfinkle noted, in the snap-in style you have to leave a wide gap between the wall and the edge of the flooring, so pretty substantial baseboard is required. This worked in my house, where the rest of the house had chunky baseboard with quarter-round, but might be harder if your home has less robust woodwork and you’re aiming for a cohesive look.

All in all, it was pretty inexpensive and a lovely floor to look at, walk on, and clean.

I don’t have a comment about price, but in regards the door jamb problem with floating laminate, you cut the molding/trim/frame to the exact height of the new floor you are installing. Door frames are not load bearing — just don’t cut the load bearing support posts which would be behind the frame and drywall. This way you can slip the laminate flooring underneath, it looks seamless and there is still room for float. I’ve done this even with metal frames. It’s a pain to problem solve the logistics of cutting the flooring so it slips under the frame on both sides, but it ultimately it will look as though the frame was never cut and much more professional.

We got glue-down tiles in a nice closeout pattern for about $2/square foot. Thank you, Lumber Liquidators! You do need a good, flat subfloor for these or any gaps or bumps or poky nail heads will show through.

Excluding the costs of the subfloor, total cost was still less than $3/sf (DIY, so labor cost = $0). The water-based glue was maybe $25. It smelled terrible and was extremely sticky and unpleasant. We rented a weighted roller for two days for another $25 or so. We already had a notched trowel and some other necessary tools. Unlike the floating plank type, the glue down type also needs to be sealed after installation, and we used about $100 worth of oil-based polyurethane. It took 2 days for 2 relatively handy amateurs to do 400 square feet, plus an hour or so for each coat of poly.

It’s not difficult, but does require patience and precision in the face of some comically sticky glue.

With the exception of one scratched area due to a very bad dog, it has held up beautifully for 6 years now. Quiet, warm, and pleasant underfoot.

How Much Does It Cost To Install Cork Flooring in the Kitchen?

We’re asking readers to share how much they spent on a given item, project, or upgrade in the kitchen. We hope this information proves helpful to anyone needing to get a basic sense of how much that something costs.

If relevant to you, please share any and all details on installing cork floors in your kitchen. What did it entail? How much was the labor? What problems came up?

Cambria Bold

5 Comments

We installed cork in a long hallway (not the kitchen), doing the install ourselves. Ours was a floating laminate-style in 100cm x 20cm planks (IIRC), with snap-in connections between planks.

Oh, and the price was extremely cheap, as we picked up a closeout color from a local shop — I think it was around $2/sq. ft.

I did cork flooring in a 15′ x 20′ (ish) kitchen, using Rossio Cork from Lumber Liquidators, and the flooring cost around $800, including oak treads for 3 steps down to a side door landing. Installation was a little under $1150, and was completed in a day by a professional Lumber Liquidators partner based out of Minneapolis. We probably could’ve installed ourselves and saved the labor costs, but at the time I thought it would be easier and ultimately better quality. I’m not sure that turned out to be the case, but it definitely saved some cursing and frustration on my part. As @joelfinkle noted, in the snap-in style you have to leave a wide gap between the wall and the edge of the flooring, so pretty substantial baseboard is required. This worked in my house, where the rest of the house had chunky baseboard with quarter-round, but might be harder if your home has less robust woodwork and you’re aiming for a cohesive look.

All in all, it was pretty inexpensive and a lovely floor to look at, walk on, and clean.

I don’t have a comment about price, but in regards the door jamb problem with floating laminate, you cut the molding/trim/frame to the exact height of the new floor you are installing. Door frames are not load bearing — just don’t cut the load bearing support posts which would be behind the frame and drywall. This way you can slip the laminate flooring underneath, it looks seamless and there is still room for float. I’ve done this even with metal frames. It’s a pain to problem solve the logistics of cutting the flooring so it slips under the frame on both sides, but it ultimately it will look as though the frame was never cut and much more professional.

We got glue-down tiles in a nice closeout pattern for about $2/square foot. Thank you, Lumber Liquidators! You do need a good, flat subfloor for these or any gaps or bumps or poky nail heads will show through.

Excluding the costs of the subfloor, total cost was still less than $3/sf (DIY, so labor cost = $0). The water-based glue was maybe $25. It smelled terrible and was extremely sticky and unpleasant. We rented a weighted roller for two days for another $25 or so. We already had a notched trowel and some other necessary tools. Unlike the floating plank type, the glue down type also needs to be sealed after installation, and we used about $100 worth of oil-based polyurethane. It took 2 days for 2 relatively handy amateurs to do 400 square feet, plus an hour or so for each coat of poly.

It’s not difficult, but does require patience and precision in the face of some comically sticky glue.

With the exception of one scratched area due to a very bad dog, it has held up beautifully for 6 years now. Quiet, warm, and pleasant underfoot.


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