Eco-friendly flooring choices Archives — Daily Pea

eco-friendly flooring choices Archives - Daily Pea

Eco-Friendly Flooring and How to Keep it Clean

Photo by Andre Spieker

Flooring is such an integral part of the home, so its great to know that there are many eco-friendly, healthy options out there. Ali from Homey Improvements  shares helpful info about choosing the right types for your homeand just as importantly, how to clean them!

There are a lot of different flooring options. If you’re pursuing an environmentally friendly one, choosing a material can be even more confusing and overwhelming. Yes, there are lots of natural and sustainable ways to floor your home; and yes, some are better than others. Here are some of the best:

Sustainably Sourced Hardwood

Many people prefer to have hardwood floors in their homes because they look nice and are easy to clean. If you’re aiming to have an eco-friendly hardwood in your home, you’ll want to find wood from a sustainable forest. The Forest Stewardship Council makes it convenient to locate such woods. Plus, there are lots of color and style options when pursuing this option.

In order to clean hardwood, you’ll need soapy water and a mop. The floor will stay cleaner longer if you also sweep and dust on a regular basis.

One of the best options, if going eco-friendly, is bamboo flooring. Bamboo is totally sustainable, naturally growing quickly in high quantities. Floors made of bamboo are generally more long lasting, as bamboo is harder — and sturdier — than many other woods. Other benefits of bamboo floors include resistance to insects, mildew and water.

Sweep, dust and mop your bamboo floor regularly. Be sure to avoid potential scratching of the floor and limit sunlight exposure, which may cause color fading.

Tiles and Linoleum

When made from recycled materials, tiles can be environmentally friendly and bring a stylish kick to your home. Natural linoleum is also a great option; it won’t attract dust and is biodegradable. Both of these options are good for moist areas in your home.

Cleaning tiles and linoleum will require soapy water, a mop and sometimes a brush or sponge. Utilize the mop regularly — about once a week — in order to keep dirt at bay. Go at the floor with a scrub brush or sponge at least once a month to keep away mold and other tougher filth.

Cork is a natural, renewable flooring option. Although many don’t consider cork when thinking about home makeup, it is a good flooring choice for many reasons. It’s a durable, insulating substance that does not attract dust and is also fire-resistant. It’s also softer and more comfortable to walk upon than hardwood. Additionally, cork can serve as a natural insect repellant.

Cleaning your cork floor is just as easy as cleaning tiles or hardwood. As with anything else, you’ll want to wipe up messes as soon as you can. You’ll also want to sweep and mop regularly to keep grime from building up. Without using a ton of water, you should also sponge your cork floor at least once a month to pick up the harder-to-tackle dirt.

Natural or Recycled Carpet

If you simply need something soft to step and lounge on, an all-natural carpet is a fine alternative to the hard selections listed above. When taking the rug route, be sure that you’re seeking materials with no chemical treatments and minimal glue and dye. Some of the best eco options in the rug department include:

  •  Wool A very strong substance that is soft as well as resistant to static. It is not cheap, but it may last longer than alternatives as it’s stain and fire-resistant.
  • Jutes Similar to hemp, jutes is a soft fiber that makes for decent carpets and rugs. Walking on jute is comfortable, and there are lots of variations in jute carpet designs. Limit the sunlight and liquid exposure to your jute carpet or rug, and utilize a vacuum when it’s time to clean.
  • Sisal Derived from the Agave sisalana plant, sisal is a stiff fiber spun into yarn. The fibers are sturdy, but will probably last longest outside main traffic areas inside your house. It’s a more expensive fiber option and, like jute, is sensitive to sunlight and moisture. A vacuum is all you need where maintenance is concerned.
  • Seagrass Less expensive than jute or sisal, Seagrass is strong and greenish. It may even smell like grass. Because it’s waxy, it is naturally stain-resistant. It is more accepting to water than sisal and jute, but it is not absorbent and should not be placed where water will sit and collect.

If you pick and choose from the list above, you should be able to cover your entire home in eco-friendly flooring — and keep them sparkling. You can feel good knowing that you’ve helped the environment, and embrace the new feeling — be it soft, fibrous or hard — under your feet.

This is a guest post by Ali Lawrence. She is a content coordinator for 12 Keys and blogs in her free time at Homey Improvements .

Eco-Friendly Flooring and How to Keep it Clean

eco-friendly flooring choices Archives - Daily Pea

Photo by Andre Spieker

Flooring is such an integral part of the home, so its great to know that there are many eco-friendly, healthy options out there. Ali from Homey Improvements  shares helpful info about choosing the right types for your homeand just as importantly, how to clean them!

There are a lot of different flooring options. If you’re pursuing an environmentally friendly one, choosing a material can be even more confusing and overwhelming. Yes, there are lots of natural and sustainable ways to floor your home; and yes, some are better than others. Here are some of the best:

Sustainably Sourced Hardwood

Many people prefer to have hardwood floors in their homes because they look nice and are easy to clean. If you’re aiming to have an eco-friendly hardwood in your home, you’ll want to find wood from a sustainable forest. The Forest Stewardship Council makes it convenient to locate such woods. Plus, there are lots of color and style options when pursuing this option.

In order to clean hardwood, you’ll need soapy water and a mop. The floor will stay cleaner longer if you also sweep and dust on a regular basis.

One of the best options, if going eco-friendly, is bamboo flooring. Bamboo is totally sustainable, naturally growing quickly in high quantities. Floors made of bamboo are generally more long lasting, as bamboo is harder — and sturdier — than many other woods. Other benefits of bamboo floors include resistance to insects, mildew and water.

Sweep, dust and mop your bamboo floor regularly. Be sure to avoid potential scratching of the floor and limit sunlight exposure, which may cause color fading.

Tiles and Linoleum

When made from recycled materials, tiles can be environmentally friendly and bring a stylish kick to your home. Natural linoleum is also a great option; it won’t attract dust and is biodegradable. Both of these options are good for moist areas in your home.

Cleaning tiles and linoleum will require soapy water, a mop and sometimes a brush or sponge. Utilize the mop regularly — about once a week — in order to keep dirt at bay. Go at the floor with a scrub brush or sponge at least once a month to keep away mold and other tougher filth.

Cork is a natural, renewable flooring option. Although many don’t consider cork when thinking about home makeup, it is a good flooring choice for many reasons. It’s a durable, insulating substance that does not attract dust and is also fire-resistant. It’s also softer and more comfortable to walk upon than hardwood. Additionally, cork can serve as a natural insect repellant.

Cleaning your cork floor is just as easy as cleaning tiles or hardwood. As with anything else, you’ll want to wipe up messes as soon as you can. You’ll also want to sweep and mop regularly to keep grime from building up. Without using a ton of water, you should also sponge your cork floor at least once a month to pick up the harder-to-tackle dirt.

Natural or Recycled Carpet

If you simply need something soft to step and lounge on, an all-natural carpet is a fine alternative to the hard selections listed above. When taking the rug route, be sure that you’re seeking materials with no chemical treatments and minimal glue and dye. Some of the best eco options in the rug department include:

  •  Wool A very strong substance that is soft as well as resistant to static. It is not cheap, but it may last longer than alternatives as it’s stain and fire-resistant.
  • Jutes Similar to hemp, jutes is a soft fiber that makes for decent carpets and rugs. Walking on jute is comfortable, and there are lots of variations in jute carpet designs. Limit the sunlight and liquid exposure to your jute carpet or rug, and utilize a vacuum when it’s time to clean.
  • Sisal Derived from the Agave sisalana plant, sisal is a stiff fiber spun into yarn. The fibers are sturdy, but will probably last longest outside main traffic areas inside your house. It’s a more expensive fiber option and, like jute, is sensitive to sunlight and moisture. A vacuum is all you need where maintenance is concerned.
  • Seagrass Less expensive than jute or sisal, Seagrass is strong and greenish. It may even smell like grass. Because it’s waxy, it is naturally stain-resistant. It is more accepting to water than sisal and jute, but it is not absorbent and should not be placed where water will sit and collect.

If you pick and choose from the list above, you should be able to cover your entire home in eco-friendly flooring — and keep them sparkling. You can feel good knowing that you’ve helped the environment, and embrace the new feeling — be it soft, fibrous or hard — under your feet.

This is a guest post by Ali Lawrence. She is a content coordinator for 12 Keys and blogs in her free time at Homey Improvements .

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